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Andy Collins

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I’m getting ready to have my first practice in a few weeks time. IMG_1769.thumb.jpg.dbf78fcf1681532a5267f6393e4a047e.jpg

Very posh. I usually just mark the center and use a tape.

Where did you get it?

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13 minutes ago, muttley9050 said:

Very posh. I usually just mark the center and use a tape.

Where did you get it?

I have a 14mm and a 25mm one from here

WWW.TFTOOLS.CO.UK

Offset Prickers Made in bright bar, improved...

 

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I have a 14mm and a 25mm one from here

20161111_163150_600x600_crop_center.jpg?v=1600187290

WWW.TFTOOLS.CO.UK
Offset Prickers Made in bright bar, improved...  

Thats where I got mine from in 25mm as I'll be building (attempting) an 8" frame. I'll also need a 3/4" for the 6" Braces. 

 

Ive got the chain morticer and 16-5/8" Beam saw and a few of these 1" Podgers from the same website. I could spend a fortune on there.  Almost got enough 6"x4" for the Braces and 8" Beams for the Frame so will make a start next time Im home. 

 

Any advice for a first time novice? 

IMG_1766.jpg

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2 minutes ago, trigger_andy said:

Thats where I got mine from in 25mm as I'll be building (attempting) an 8" frame. I'll also need a 3/4" for the 6" Braces. 

 

Ive got the chain morticer and 16-5/8" Beam saw and a few of these 1" Podgers from the same website. I could spend a fortune on there. :D Almost got enough 6"x4" for the Braces and 8" Beams for the Frame so will make a start next time Im home. 

 

Any advice for a first time novice? 

I cant spend too long on that site, they sell some proper tool porn.

I've only done 3 frames so my advice won't be that comprehensive.

The most important thing aesthetically is to make sure the shoulders of all your tenons are properly lined up. Don't make the tenons so tight you have to fight to get them together as it'll end up being a pita to assemble. 

Always think as far ahead as you can before cutting anything.

Use the downward cutting side of the chain mortiser when you're working on the lines of your mortises as it stops tear out.

You'll learn loads by doing it yourself anyway. Don't rush!

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47 minutes ago, trigger_andy said:

Thats where I got mine from in 25mm as I'll be building (attempting) an 8" frame. I'll also need a 3/4" for the 6" Braces. 

 

Ive got the chain morticer and 16-5/8" Beam saw and a few of these 1" Podgers from the same website. I could spend a fortune on there. emoji3.png Almost got enough 6"x4" for the Braces and 8" Beams for the Frame so will make a start next time Im home. 

 

Any advice for a first time novice? 

IMG_1766.jpg

Those Wood Owl bits are quality, you'll enjoy using it.

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Those Wood Owl bits are quality, you'll enjoy using it.

I bought those wood owls. Epic drill bits.

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Thats where I got mine from in 25mm as I'll be building (attempting) an 8" frame. I'll also need a 3/4" for the 6" Braces.    Ive got the chain morticer and 16-5/8" Beam saw and a few of these 1" Podgers from the same website. I could spend a fortune on there.  Almost got enough 6"x4" for the Braces and 8" Beams for the Frame so will make a start next time Im home. 

 

Any advice for a first time novice? 

IMG_1766.thumb.jpg.0daaf5e1946507bbf6b0538a91047f9e.jpg

 

My advice would be. Get your self a framing square to go with your speed square. Decent chisels. A slick if you can afford it. Use the framing square to set the size of the tenons/mortices for easy refrence.Don't assume the wood you are using is square or straight or the same size as the last piece.

Choose the timber for each piece by looking at the grain.

Cut your mortices a hair bigger than your tenons.

Try to get the hole thing done as quickly as you can when you start. If it takes you a while test fit all your joints again before raising.

Have fun

 

Fwiw I use 3/4 pegs on 8"framing.

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17 hours ago, muttley9050 said:

My advice would be. Get your self a framing square to go with your speed square. Decent chisels. A slick if you can afford it. Use the framing square to set the size of the tenons/mortices for easy refrence.Don't assume the wood you are using is square or straight or the same size as the last piece.

Choose the timber for each piece by looking at the grain.

Cut your mortices a hair bigger than your tenons.

Try to get the hole thing done as quickly as you can when you start. If it takes you a while test fit all your joints again before raising.

Have fun

 

Fwiw I use 3/4 pegs on 8"framing.

Got a framing square and inherited my Grandfathers tool chest he built as an apprentice Shipwright and it has a nice selection of chisels up to 2" and Ive bought my own as well. I am missing a slick though and will be buying one soon. :) 

 

Ive a couple of Timber Framing books Ive studied and the usual youtube video watching so really looking forward to making a start. 

 

Ive went with 1" Pegs for 8" framing as its the size in the books Ive got seemed to be the size recommended on a few US based forums as well. But I can see how 3/4" would be adequate. Ive got the tools and dowels for 1" now so will go with that, but will need the 3/4" anyway for the 6" Bracing. 

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A dining table made out of London Plane that I finished today - for myself! I milled this tree a couple of years ago for Jo at Hardy Tree Surgeons and he kindly let me keep a few of the quartersawn boards I had cut.

The rails of the frame are held together with a haunched mortise and tenon on the long sides and with festool domino connectors on the short sides so it can be disassembled for storage/transportation.

The top is made from quartersawn boards for stability and also to show off the "lacewood" grain patterns. It's held to the base with table buttons which allow for seasonal movement but also hold it down tight.

The grain might not be to everyone's taste but I think it's quite memorising and makes a change from looking at Oak.IMG_20190827_175734_208.thumb.jpeg.b14224e0dc65081a8ba1ada23413b13e.jpegIMG_20190827_175734_210.thumb.jpeg.e96633f8ebca82b432957188b7c4c7ab.jpegScreenshot_20190827_183639.thumb.jpeg.5e9c14b456ecaecf576ba55144aef016.jpegScreenshot_20190827_183608.thumb.jpeg.d4823bb05d2f64466271d5da14f2ca0f.jpegIMG_20190827_175734_213.thumb.jpeg.9cd46f135cb0ffd2a2f699afe77686a2.jpegIMG_20190827_175734_230.thumb.jpeg.5e5ae7f2aeff1e168924c9e6b7abf045.jpeg

Beautifully finished
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