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flatyre

charging churches?

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Sorry for another post, its raining here again so at home thinking ways to drum up more business. How do you guys feel about charging churches for tree work? personally I have a lot of faith just not in organised religions. So don't have any convictions about it. Round here all the main church denominations also own huge tracts of land which is rented out to farmers etc. So I see churches as businesses, and as such would not have any problem doing business with them. They might be a good source of work given that many have mature trees in the grounds. Traditionally a member of the congregation with access to a saw would have carried out any work required, but with ever tightening laws and insurances regarding public spaces, that might change creating business for professionals. Does anyone currently do work on church grounds, graveyards, vicarage/manse property and what's the general consensus/unwritten rules?

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Sorry for another post, its raining here again so at home thinking ways to drum up more business. How do you guys feel about charging churches for tree work? personally I have a lot of faith just not in organised religions. So don't have any convictions about it. Round here all the main church denominations also own huge tracts of land which is rented out to farmers etc. So I see churches as businesses, and as such would not have any problem doing business with them. They might be a good source of work given that many have mature trees in the grounds. Traditionally a member of the congregation with access to a saw would have carried out any work required, but with ever tightening laws and insurances regarding public spaces, that might change creating business for professionals. Does anyone currently do work on church grounds, graveyards, vicarage/manse property and what's the general consensus/unwritten rules?

 

 

I quote a lot of work for the Methodist church! 👍🏻 can be good work

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Sorry for another post, its raining here again so at home thinking ways to drum up more business. How do you guys feel about charging churches for tree work? personally I have a lot of faith just not in organised religions. So don't have any convictions about it. Round here all the main church denominations also own huge tracts of land which is rented out to farmers etc. So I see churches as businesses, and as such would not have any problem doing business with them. They might be a good source of work given that many have mature trees in the grounds. Traditionally a member of the congregation with access to a saw would have carried out any work required, but with ever tightening laws and insurances regarding public spaces, that might change creating business for professionals. Does anyone currently do work on church grounds, graveyards, vicarage/manse property and what's the general consensus/unwritten rules?

 

Charge them a fair rate, they've got the money to pay it. :001_smile:

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They got pots of dosh . just pretend they haven't . The Vatican is the richest organisation next to the mafia !

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They're certainly not short of money, have any of you noticed an upturn in work from churches due to stricter laws and insurances? Round here in the past churches would never have paid for work, over the last few years I've noticed more and more contractors cutting church grass and painting the railings.

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I am currently working a consultancy job for a cemetery. Its very complex given the situation, existing problems, statutory designations, other legal issues, current and future use etc. Oh, and not forgetting that everything has to go through a committee!

 

They are being charged accordingly for my services.

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They're certainly not short of money, have any of you noticed an upturn in work from churches due to stricter laws and insurances? Round here in the past churches would never have paid for work, over the last few years I've noticed more and more contractors cutting church grass and painting the railings.

 

There probably doing community service

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Some churches have a lot of money, some don't. Some wealthy villages/town churches can afford tree work as much as anyone whereas some struggle to patch roofs or keep the grass cut.

 

I do a reasonable amount of work for the poorer churches in my area (and yes I do know they are poor and have seen their accounts) and so help them out where possible for the community aspect. You tend to get reasonable contacts through the other parishioners anyway

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Charge what you normally would. Despite what is said the church is a business in many senses so you should treat them as such. How ever much I love my job I won't do it for free or significantly reduced rates unless it is a real just cause.

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