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cornish wood burner

Ash age hardening ?

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I've just been splitting some 6 to 12 inch ash that has been in the back of my shed for a few years. Almost all needs the full 8 tonne of my splitter, then it goes off like a gun. I kept these rounds intact for ease of handling but I'm having a rethink on that.

Is it the sap hardening doing this?

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All wood does this to a certain degree . Try some 5 year old eucalyptus with an axe .....What a hoot ! :biggrin:

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All wood does this to a certain degree . Try some 5 year old eucalyptus with an axe .....What a hoot ! :biggrin:

Know what you mean, we cut down a eucalyptus many years ago and as you say doesn't get easier with keeping. We had a bit left that we used wedges on in the end.

It was the muzzle velocity of this ash that surprised me. You wouldn't want to be in front of it. Other pieces I split after a couple of years and they were very easy. Amazing difference.

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most species have some sort of hardening unless they get a fungal infection (not always obvious or visible) which breaks down the lignin making splitting easier.

 

 

i had some ash which had been left outside and the parts that had not succumbed to rot were like stone and bone dry...

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I,ve only encountered 1 type of wood that was harder than well seasoned KNOTTY ash and that was a lump of African iron wood that was (as tales go) used as a weight on an old sailing ship to stop cargo sliding all over the place.

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I've just been splitting some 6 to 12 inch ash that has been in the back of my shed for a few years. Almost all needs the full 8 tonne of my splitter, then it goes off like a gun. I kept these rounds intact for ease of handling but I'm having a rethink on that.

Is it the sap hardening doing this?

 

No but as the timber dries it becomes brittle.

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"ballast" that's the word I was looking for mate:thumbup1:

 

dunnage was the grade we sold for milling into blocks for securing loads in ship's holds ballast tended to be stone or metal

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dunnage was the grade we sold for milling into blocks for securing loads in ship's holds ballast tended to be stone or metal

 

 

Spot on usually ballast was stone or brick or pig iron

 

Dunnage is timber used to stop loads moving in holds etc

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