Jump to content
briscoe

Spiking choking climbing line

Recommended Posts

You can also use a caribiner to tighten your strop

 

ImageUploadedByArbtalk1449913043.896050.jpg.1070a25f0163c7a74d1f5f6225de65bb.jpg

 

On this stem I was anchored to a neighbouring tree for safety and then used two strops , the black strop is a zillon strop choked with a caribiner. You can just make it out at the bottom of the picture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks that's what I was after. My friction device is just a prussik so not sure how easy it would be to climb back up on . I think this running bowline as a backup to flip line when spiking is now part of npt c cs38 or 39 ? Cheers

 

Yeah the running bowline attached with a short Prussik is what we were taught in our cs38 the other week as a backup to the flip line.

 

You could use a karabiner instead of the bowline but it isn't as ideal, it is quicker and easier though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks that's what I was after. My friction device is just a prussik so not sure how easy it would be to climb back up on . I think this running bowline as a backup to flip line when spiking is now part of npt c cs38 or 39 ? Cheers

 

 

No worries mate. Yeah a prussik will make life a little harder, it's doable but a pain. Like Mark said a fig8 is a good cheep option or if don't feel confident on that then you can always look at pulleys systems or mechanical devices but if I were you I would stick with the prussik until you are confident to use other bits of kit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The good thing about a zig zag is you can just tie it off on a running bowline then decend on that. Tbh I rarely choke my line only if in a awkward position. Most the time I clip it on back of my harness out the way

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
even with a zigzag you should really use a fig8. Its just not designed for that sort of decent on a single line.

 

 

I'm not an SRT man myself but I thought these zigzags were used constantly to descent on a single line. If I'm wrong (which I probably am) could you explain why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not an SRT man myself but I thought these zigzags were used constantly to descent on a single line. If I'm wrong (which I probably am) could you explain why?

Yes they are used in SRT but along with a rope wrench which puts the necessary bite in the rope to control decent. You could in theory decend without this bite but would have to do so very slowly and carefully, certainly not best practice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes they are used in SRT but along with a rope wrench which puts the necessary bite in the rope to control decent. You could in theory decend without this bite but would have to do so very slowly and carefully, certainly not best practice

 

 

Ahh fair enough, I see. Haven't really had much experience with SRT stuff so don't really know all the ins and outs of the stuff. Thanks for clearing that up for me mate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.