Jump to content
Morris

Ferrirotor Rotor S Stump Drill / Grinder - wanted

Recommended Posts

Hi All

 

New to this forum and first time poster!

 

I wanted to ask your advice and opinions on a job I need doing.

 

I have 200 - 300 stumps (ranging in size from 300mm to 800mm diameter) that I need to remove as efficiently and economically as possible without doing undue damage to the surrounding woodland area and remaining trees. The stumps are predominantly oak stumps 80% with the remainder being beech and willow. The woodland is an old oak plantation (approx 100 yrs old) spread over 5 hectares. The site is accessible by tractor when the ground conditions are favourable but it is a wet woodland.

 

I've been told a stump grinding team could probably work through 20 stumps a day but I came across an amazing bit of kit called a Rotor S (made in Italy by a company called Ferrirotor) that appeared to drill its way through a stump in a matter of minutes and I wondered if this might be a more economical way of processing these stumps. The problem is I can't seem to find anybody in the UK who owns or has used a Rotor S.

 

Has anybody on here got any experience or working knowledge about the Rotor S?

 

I would like to learn more about this piece of kit and it's costs (aside from the company website info) and ideally I'd like to hire one or contract a company that has one to come and do the work if it turns out to be cheaper than traditional stump grinding services.

 

Can anybody offer any advice or opinion? What are your thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Morris,

Other than having viewed youtube clips of various different brands of tractors using the Ferrirotor, and marvelling at its apparent effectivness and speed.

I do wonder how much of its speed is due to the fact that it always appeared to be used on Poplar stumps on sandy friable ground?

i.e. very weak timber, & not massive stumps.

 

I also wondered is there not a digger mounted "Hydracrack" type screw splitter (and i believe there are several about) that would do the same job, with perhaps better control?

Certainly a tracked digger would allow for better access to wet ground.

cheers

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even a 25hp grinder get's a lot more than 20 Stumps done a day.

With a 7015 or a 60tx it should be a breeze. Any predator 50 users here?

 

With a rotor you will have big chunks of wood and need a tractor, that probably is harder to manouveur through the woods than a tracked grinder. Never used one, but I bet an 80cm oak stump will bring a rotor to it's limit while the roots remain untouched.

 

Just my thoughts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even a 25hp grinder get's a lot more than 20 Stumps done a day.

With a 7015 or a 60tx it should be a breeze. Any predator 50 users here?

 

With a rotor you will have big chunks of wood and need a tractor, that probably is harder to manouveur through the woods than a tracked grinder. Never used one, but I bet an 80cm oak stump will bring a rotor to it's limit while the roots remain untouched.

 

Just my thoughts

 

I was thinking its a bit of a chocolate teapot. On a nice flat site where all the stumps are of a uniform small diameter it will be ok. In my experience this is rarely the case and the tractor will never get level to do a straight drill. I also wonder how it would get on when the stump is bigger than the drill, how would the drill center and stay on the bit remaiming when going for a second bite ? I can see this just wandering off center and missing loads.

Cant see these machines replacing a conventional grinder. Just thoughts.

 

Bob

Edited by aspenarb
fat fingers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

has anybody seen the video from netherlands with the dipper end of the excavator with a sharpened up box that just sliced thru the stumps i thought that was quite a good idea but it was on poplar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Everybody,

 

Thanks for all your replies so far

 

Difflock - Yes I have looked at screw type splitters. Somebody suggested a Lasco splitter with a grinding attachment to fit on a 360. It looked effective but on the bigger stumps I think it would still take some time. Who knows, maybe there are no quick fixes.

 

I also hear everybody's comments about the Rotor S appearing to do well on soft timber in favourable ground and question how well it would suit the conditions I have to work with. If only we had any first hand experience to go on lol.

 

Trigger - I'm in Devon just north of Dartmoor

 

Marne - I'll google some of the options you suggested, afraid I'm not familiar with grinder sizes, brands and power output but I appreciate bigger kit will get the job done faster but that there will always be the pay off between kit specs and site conditions etc. Hopefully I'll be able to figure out the most efficient and cost effect compromise.

 

Thanks for everything so far guys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  •  

  • Featured Adverts

  • Tip site reviews

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.