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anyone ever write a rebuttal to kiln drying

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Hi all, I sell kiln dried logs and the common mis conception I have with clients is that the word 'kiln' implies the log has gone though a prosses involving some sort of electrical or forced heated prosses.

 

The word 'kiln' should imply a state of moisture content. Some air dried logs do get bellow that 20% mark so if you can garentee that all of the logs are bellow that 20% mark then sell them as kiln dried.

 

Some of my logs don't even register any moisture (mainly the sycamore) and the ash, beach and oak are around the 6-12% moisture. I don't put my logs in a unenviromently friendly electric powered kiln they are stacked and dried out properly in a greenhouse. Supper environmentaly friendly.

 

:confused1: Err No, the word kiln is defined as

 

"a furnace or oven for burning, baking, or drying, esp. one for calcining lime or firing pottery."

 

So "Kiln" dried logs need to have been dried in a "kiln" to be advertised as such.

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:confused1: Err No, the word kiln is defined as

 

"a furnace or oven for burning, baking, or drying, esp. one for calcining lime or firing pottery."

 

So "Kiln" dried logs need to have been dried in a "kiln" to be advertised as such.

 

Okay thought I might get that type of response.

 

So if I dried my logs out in a large greenhouse (which isn't a kiln) and I am producing logs dryer than the numerous 'kiln dried' log supplies near me, what do I sell my logs as then? 'Really bloody dry logs which arnt kiln dried but are air dried by warm air heated by the sun for free' dried logs.

 

I would rather stick with kiln dried as in the joinery/cabinet trade (which I am as well) it doesn't matter how the last few % of moisture is dried off its still called kiln dried as it emplies a state of moisture content.

 

In the joinery trade we have three types of moisture content green <25%, air dried 25-18% and kiln dried >18%.

Roughly speaking.

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If you are drying your logs in a greenhouse, it is a type of forced (ie artificial) drying and I don't think that the term kiln dried is inaccurate. A greenhouse is after all a solar kiln of sorts.

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If you are drying your logs in a greenhouse, it is a type of forced (ie artificial) drying and I don't think that the term kiln dried is inaccurate. A greenhouse is after all a solar kiln of sorts.

 

exactly, solar kilns work just as well as other types of kilns.

 

if your air dried logs are as good a moisture content than a kiln dried log then you can point that out but you should not be selling them as kiln dried.

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exactly, solar kilns work just as well as other types of kilns.

 

if your air dried logs are as good a moisture content than a kiln dried log then you can point that out but you should not be selling them as kiln dried.

 

Well my logs are sold as solar kiln dried and I have never had a problem with that description and there all guaranteed less than 20% moisture content.

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Well my logs are sold as solar kiln dried and I have never had a problem with that description and there all guaranteed less than 20% moisture content.

 

Solar Kiln Dried - Yes, that's got a certain ring to it.

 

Sounds environmentally sound and I hope one day to find the time to develop that approach to drying myself to suppliment existing methods I have pioneered.

 

Just got to do the legwork and complete the learning curve, using the principles I have developed an understanding of over the years.

 

Solar Kiln drying needs no rebuttal, rather it should be applauded. :001_smile:

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Well my logs are sold as solar kiln dried and I have never had a problem with that description and there all guaranteed less than 20% moisture content.

 

if they are done in a solar kiln like polytunnels and greenhouses (or any other sort of solar kiln) then that's fine but if they are just left outside in fresh air then that's false advertising in my opinion.

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if they are done in a solar kiln like polytunnels and greenhouses (or any other sort of solar kiln) then that's fine but if they are just left outside in fresh air then that's false advertising in my opinion.

 

Solar powered kiln kiln is much sexier than polytunnel dried

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Solar powered kiln kiln is much sexier than polytunnel dried

 

I do take exception to that. My Solar kilns are designed to dry wood not to grow vegs. If I stood my IBC containers in my veg tunnels then the firewood would go mouldy due to the high humidity.

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