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Ragwort question

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Sue, Thanks for alerting me, I can take the flack for using the word incorrectly and would ask any naturalist what word I should be using to describe a plant which spreads out of control to areas where it is not wanted:biggrin:

 

Steve, to the best of my knowledge Its about 40 acres, I ran 76 ewes at the end of 2013 for three months, and 18 calves stayed there for a month at the end of 2014, other than that it was not used or topped.

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Sue, Thanks for alerting me, I can take the flack for using the word incorrectly and would ask any naturalist what word I should be using to describe a plant which spreads out of control to areas where it is not wanted:biggrin:

 

.

If you're short of words I've learnt a fair few Scottish ones that might suit .....!

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Ragwort and livestock aren't a good mix. Certainly in commercial agriculture, it would be considered poor husbandry to allow it to go rampant on grazing land. Just because animals aren't dropping like flies, doesn't mean that commercial performance isn't being effected by the occasional mouthful of Ragwort: it just isn't worth the risk. That said, there is a difference between intensive, and extensive grazing land: different management regimes can apply.

 

As for the over/under grazing question, that can be rather subjective and dependant on your particular circumstances/ aims: in general though, close grazing maintains a good Sward.

 

With regard to the use of agro-chemicals: I'm afraid they're the main reason why we're able to feed the world (at least we could if we wanted). And anyone who thinks farmers are using them willy nilly, is out of touch with the commercial realities of modern farming ( though granted; there may still be people out there with more money than sense ).

 

Spot treatment with glyphosate is effective against Ragwort if done correctly. The use of a weed wipe can also be effective. Pulling can be hard work, and as mentioned, plant parts can be left behind. Cutting of developed flower heads is a good idea.

 

If you have a flower rich meadow, then I certainly wouldn't want to use an overall herbicide. But, if it's full of Ragwort, Docks, and Thistles, then it might be the most appropriate action.

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Ref: "With regard to the use of agro-chemicals: I'm afraid they're the main reason why we're able to feed the world (at least we could if we wanted)."

 

I'll fix that for you....

 

"With regard to the use of agro-chemicals: I'm afraid they're the main way we are feeding the world (at least we could if we wanted)."

 

It's been proven that organic farming has higher long term outputs so farming with chemicals is never going to be a long term solution to feeding people.

 

But of course, the NFU, UKGov and chemical companies want everyone to believe that their way is the only way.

cheers, Steve

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Ref: "With regard to the use of agro-chemicals: I'm afraid they're the main reason why we're able to feed the world (at least we could if we wanted)."

 

I'll fix that for you....

 

"With regard to the use of agro-chemicals: I'm afraid they're the main way we are feeding the world (at least we could if we wanted)."

 

It's been proven that organic farming has higher long term outputs so farming with chemicals is never going to be a long term solution to feeding people.

 

But of course, the NFU, UKGov and chemical companies want everyone to believe that their way is the only way.

cheers, Steve

 

Apologies for any grammatical errors.

 

I live in the real world! Clearly you have zero practical experience.

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Must be a bad picture because I can't see a single stem of Ragwort in there. cheers

 

Its definitely alive and well here :thumbdown: its also popping up in among area`s like fern and bramble that I dont want to disturb. Despite it raining here for two days now the ground is still like concrete and it snaps off while pulling. This only a fraction of it:thumbdown:

 

image.jpg2_zpsdvnhkwio.jpg

 

image.jpg3_zpsofx33knx.jpg

 

image.jpg1_zpshda37fok.jpg

 

image.jpg4_zpsg6r1fuer.jpg

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Apologies for any grammatical errors.

 

I live in the real world! Clearly you have zero practical experience.

 

I wasn't picking you up on your grammar.

I'll crawl off now for a sit down and ponder in our 16 acres of agro-çhemical free meadows.

Happy days :thumbup:

cheers, Steve

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Its definitely alive and well here :thumbdown: its also popping up in among area`s like fern and bramble that I dont want to disturb. Despite it raining here for two days now the ground is still like concrete and it snaps off while pulling. This only a fraction of it:thumbdown:

 

image.jpg2_zpsdvnhkwio.jpg

 

image.jpg3_zpsofx33knx.jpg

 

image.jpg1_zpshda37fok.jpg

 

image.jpg4_zpsg6r1fuer.jpg

 

What's your plan? Are you going to let it go to seed and then pull? cheers

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I wasn't picking you up on your grammar.

I'll crawl off now for a sit down and ponder in our 16 acres of agro-çhemical free meadows.

Happy days :thumbup:

cheers, Steve

 

There's nothing wrong with chemical free meadows: enjoy them:001_smile:

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