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Stefan Palokangas

Post your stump grinding photos

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we have the same machine @Jcarbor  good machine but heavy.

 

@josharb87 did you consider the Pred 38, better cutting specs and same engine HP, vari tracks etc

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I’ve had that machine for years now, I can’t fault it, I had it fully remoted not long ago its good to be able to operate it without the umbilical.

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4 hours ago, Ian C said:

we have the same machine @Jcarbor  good machine but heavy.

 

@josharb87 did you consider the Pred 38, better cutting specs and same engine HP, vari tracks etc

Briefly, but predator machines seemed to have mixed reviews Online and was more money. 

 

The vermeer 362 was option nr2, but was 1500 more.

Simply came down to price and wanting to try a bandit product in the end.

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I had the job of demolishing a Victorian brick wall for my brother near where I live. It had been pushed sideways into a precarious state by a large old coppiced bay tree. This had been removed a few years ago by a local company who had an attempt at stump grinding but gave up.

 

@aspenarb bob very generously offered me the use of his little T Mech grinder over a weekend but I was thwarted by lack of anything to transport it with and my brother's reluctance to upset the neighbours at a weekend. I think it would have been a bit much for it but I would have liked to try it working.

 

I had mentioned the stump to someone I labour for occasionally and by chance he had another grinding job nearby and was able to come in with his Dosko this afternoon.

 

The machine performed admirably, I used to dislike using it in the past as it is such hard work, the last grinder I used was a carlton 8015 which would have minced the stump in less than an hour but probably have damaged the wall plinth.

 

Before picture complete with this year's regrowth  and after 2 hours later. I have a few bits left to chop off the wall.bay1.thumb.jpg.1830151340233421fa008436bc1ce6dc.jpg

 

bay2.thumb.jpg.91297e282e4be55ff116f2ddb4ac576d.jpg

 

 

I'm not a fan of unnecessary stump removal but this thing was an ongoing problem with the wall and many attempts to kill the regrowth.

 

I had a reminder of the importance of old stumps in my garden last week where I decided the cherry stump left by my shed door was hindering access, so I deployed my non patent stump burner and burned out the core of the stump to the subsoil. This left me with 3 125mm laterals which I drew out with a Hi lift jack. In one I found 3 stag beetle larvae, which is why I like a few stumps left to decay. Surrey , and my garden, is one of the last refuges for stag beetles.

 

I gathered the remaining roots with one larva still attached and two loose in my other hand and placed them into the bottom of my holly hedge when one of the ungrateful blighters gave me a nip good enough for me to shake him off in surprise.

Anyway all three are now under the hedge with the roots and a few saucepans of chainsaw chipping covering them, I hope they can feed peacefully for a few years before emerging for their brief lives as warriors.

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A few surprises in today's work.  Half way through this stump, when the client suddenly spotted a baby hedgehog hiding behind the stump up against the wall. Moved him to safety by a woodchip pile, went back to the stump to see mum moving about. Moved her to the baby who was very young, eyes still closed, went back to the stump and uncovered two more. How the Hell the mother managed to dig in is beyond me. Rocks, building stones and flints in the stump and underneath. Photo showing how much I had to dig out with a pick, plus careful grinding.

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Good work David, a few years back I was driving through a hamlet and saw a hedgepig struggling down the road caught up in garden netting, clearly exhausted.

 

I put it in the back of the truck, took it home and by hook or crook managed to cut the netting away, then placed it in a quiet place with a cracked chicken egg in front of it, then left it alone.

 

Couple of hours later the contents of the egg, and the HH had disappeared, since then, much to my dog’s annoyance, we have a regular supply of fat hodge pigs  patrolling the garden, eating slugs.

 

I like to think they are it’s descendants.

 

I did explode a mole on the same day, so it’s swings and roundabouts as to my status 

St Francis of Assisi wise.

Edited by Mick Dempsey
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Awkward wind blown eucalyptus stump. Tried to cut it up with a saw but chain dulled instantly. Too much dirt in it...did consider hiring digger and lifting out of garden but acsess too narrow...approach angle just about within the operating limits of the machine. All went well IMG_20190619_133757.jpegIMG_20190619_135637.jpeg

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On 02/10/2019 at 14:26, GlobalNewark said:


Posted by one of my customers yesterday

Why?

 

 

Here`s one from one of my customers that didnt want to spend any money on this stump, back there next week so we will see how its gone:)

 

IMG_2999.thumb.JPG.359ed58d7ebc75aef8cb93e76f07ec66.JPG

Edited by aspenarb
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13 hours ago, aspenarb said:

Why?

 

 

Here`s one from one of my customers that didnt want to spend any money on this stump, back there next week so we will see how its gone:)

 

IMG_2999.thumb.JPG.359ed58d7ebc75aef8cb93e76f07ec66.JPG

I had a client years ago, before stump grinders were commonplace.

 

He had a biggish beech stump that he asked about burning out. I said it wasn't really a practical proposition.

Six months late when on site again he'd done it. He own a manufacturing company using MDF, turns out he came home from the pub a few nights a week with friends, lit a fire, had a few more brews and set some fireworks off :D . 

 

Don't think that the neighbours were that impressed but his persistence paid off, only took an estimated ten tons of pallets and MDF off-cuts.

 

 

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