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madbopper

Fence post lifespan

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Good idea in theory.

 

Can you find me 250 pieces of nice straight robinia 8 feet long. :thumbup:

 

 

i might know someone who can supply square ekki posts.

 

he is selling 8' oak 3x3" posts for £8

 

 

i'll see what sizes he's got...

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Iv no experience from the clipex system, but from what I can gather from the videos it will surely only work in prime good soils, what happens if your on hard ground and need a bit of clout to get the posts in- would it stand up to a tractor mounted driver hitting the posts-would have thought they would just buckle? also it seems the system only works if you can guarantee being able to knock each post fully into depth each time. and Id love to see those strainers assemblies holding upto even remotely soft peat. Im not sold but would happily give it a go in 'real world' hill conditions and see...

 

Inclined to agree with this. Looks like a great system on deep mineral soils but I can see it being extremely frustrating elsewhere.

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Iv no experience from the clipex system, but from what I can gather from the videos it will surely only work in prime good soils, what happens if your on hard ground and need a bit of clout to get the posts in- would it stand up to a tractor mounted driver hitting the posts-would have thought they would just buckle? also it seems the system only works if you can guarantee being able to knock each post fully into depth each time. and Id love to see those strainers assemblies holding upto even remotely soft peat. Im not sold but would happily give it a go in 'real world' hill conditions and see...

 

Clipex has been used in Argyll in what you call "real world" conditions with great success. Yes each post does have to be knocked into the full depth but it is equally bad practice to cut the top off wooden posts and posts which last perhaps 5 - 10 years at best look expensive in comparisson. The Clipex posts are easier to knock in as you have a much reduced displacement compaired to wooden posts. As I have said previously it's not the answer to all the fencing problems (there isn't one) but is is a fantastic inovation and like anything else should be judged on it's merits. If you want to try it let me know.

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So we all seem to have come to the same conclusion, fence posts are not lasting as long as we would like,

I like the idea of the robinia not to sure about the oak,

 

But going back to our standard round treated posts who makes the best posts in the country price not important quality is what I am after.

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So we all seem to have come to the same conclusion, fence posts are not lasting as long as we would like,

I like the idea of the robinia not to sure about the oak,

 

But going back to our standard round treated posts who makes the best posts in the country price not important quality is what I am after.

 

Apologies for what has become a hi-jack of you'r thread. If you can get the more durable timber in the quantity you require, go for it. Alternatively you are looking at either pressure treated creosote or Class 4.

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To be honest Bob I'm leaning more towards the clipex system.

I bet there's a good discount for arbtalk members:thumbup1:

 

I will be looking into this a lot more I'm afraid us english seem to get stuck in a rut doing a job because that's how it's always been done, " my dad used wooden posts and his dad as well "

 

Can you explain how you tie of to a strainer with the clipex system ?

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To be honest Bob I'm leaning more towards the clipex system.

I bet there's a good discount for arbtalk members:thumbup1:

 

I will be looking into this a lot more I'm afraid us english seem to get stuck in a rut doing a job because that's how it's always been done, " my dad used wooden posts and his dad as well "

 

Can you explain how you tie of to a strainer with the clipex system ?

 

Can't slate the English, I work for an English company :blushing: and it's just the same in Scotland.

Tying to a strainer can either be done by wraping the wire around the strainer and tying as normal or you can ues Gripple "T" clips which is the prefered method.

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To be honest Bob I'm leaning more towards the clipex system.

I bet there's a good discount for arbtalk members:thumbup1:

 

I will be looking into this a lot more I'm afraid us english seem to get stuck in a rut doing a job because that's how it's always been done, " my dad used wooden posts and his dad as well "

 

Can you explain how you tie of to a strainer with the clipex system ?

 

Glad you have learnt a lot from people talking about Clipex fencing.

Any fencer dos not want to now about fencing lasting 30 years as they will never go back to that job, before you start complaining about my last coment I do a lot of fencing.

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Any fencer dos not want to now about fencing lasting 30 years as they will never go back to that job.

 

got to agree with that:thumbup1: Im doing more and more concrete post jobs as opposed to wood. As you say that's another potential customer lost for the future.:thumbdown:

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Glad you have learnt a lot from people talking about Clipex fencing.

Any fencer dos not want to now about fencing lasting 30 years as they will never go back to that job, before you start complaining about my last coment I do a lot of fencing.

 

I hadn't really thought about not wanting it to last,they can't be blamed if a post rots off, and they get to put in a new one, the fence I'm doing will be on my own property and I would like to only ever do it once,

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