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madbopper

Fence post lifespan

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So this is the problem.

I have got to install an ag type fence post and wire. The thing is this has got to be very substantial and I only want to do the job once.

What do you view the expected life of let's say a 5" post driven in to firm gravel.

Is there anything else I can do to stop them rotting off at ground level, I don't mind if I have to buy the posts a month before and stand them in some sort of extra preservative.

 

This post will probably lead on to lots of questions regarding differant things to use as posts,

Looks will not be as important as strength and lifespan.

Cheers russ

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Chestnut, durable but can be a bit of a bugger for splitting- particularly when driven into hard ground.

 

Creosote- probably the best in terms of durability but expensive- almost double that of Chestnut.

 

Various UC4 treated softwood usually with guarantees, which usually aren't worth the paper they are written on

 

I think id go for 5inch round chestnuts out of all of the above.

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Chestnut, durable but can be a bit of a bugger for splitting- particularly when driven into hard ground.

 

Creosote- probably the best in terms of durability but expensive- almost double that of Chestnut.

 

Various UC4 treated softwood usually with guarantees, which usually aren't worth the paper they are written on

 

I think id go for 5inch round chestnuts out of all of the above.

 

I agree with Matthew, the current offerings of treated softwood don't seem to last long. We a getting failures on some in less than 5 years.

 

 

I have both chestnut and hold and cold dipped treated softwood still ok after 40 years on a sandy, well drained soil

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I've got the same problem, posts rotting off at ground level in less than 5 years. Even a 7"x7" gate post just snapped where rotted at ground level in 4 years. I am on heavy waterlogged clay though.

 

I've started milling my own 4"x4" oak and chestnut posts, as untreated green oak.chestnut will last me longer than any modern softwood pressure treated with the rubbish they are allowed to use these days.

 

I'm tempted to buy some good old fashioned creosote, and soak the bottom couple of feet of the new posts for a month or two. There's creosoted softwood fence posts here that the previous owner put in 40 to 50 years ago that are still going strong. Do it once, do it well! Just be aware that creosote if frowned on these days, but I don't think it's banned for this use, please correct me if I'm wrong.

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With regards the chestnut posts, would these come treated and peeled or are they just cut and pointed.

 

 

Thinking way out side the box does anybody make a galv post with holes that you can fit wire to with out staples obviously :confused1:

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