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MikeM

How dry can seasoned logs get?

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We went for excessive ventilation, it's got a 70cm netting strip all the way around all the sides at the base and netting in the doors at head height, plus I never got round to putting the main doors on yet so when the wind blows it does get inside :biggrin:.

 

I figured there is no way I could control the moisture in winter, it'll be as damp as the ambient conditions outside but at least the wood wont be getting rained on, and if we have some dryish days, then the good air flow should hopefully keep on top of it and maybe even dry it again.

 

I used to store wood in a shed with no ventilation but lifted off the ground and no double stacking. It used to take 2 years to get to the same condition as the wood in the tunnel this year that has taken 6 months. Air movement is everything.

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How logs are seasoned in a combination of vented bulk bags and log crates undercover in ventilated barns. Spot check on moisture contents this week give a range of 15 - 18% (pin method) & 16% (oven dry test).

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We went for excessive ventilation, it's got a 70cm netting strip all the way around all the sides at the base and netting in the doors at head height, plus I never got round to putting the main doors on yet so when the wind blows it does get inside :biggrin:.

 

I figured there is no way I could control the moisture in winter, it'll be as damp as the ambient conditions outside but at least the wood wont be getting rained on, and if we have some dryish days, then the good air flow should hopefully keep on top of it and maybe even dry it again.

 

I used to store wood in a shed with no ventilation but lifted off the ground and no double stacking. It used to take 2 years to get to the same condition as the wood in the tunnel this year that has taken 6 months. Air movement is everything.

 

we have done the same thing 1m extensions to lift the height, 3ft mesh around the base extra wide openings so no doors unless custom made, hang some old tarps just to keep the worst of the rain out. beech which in march you could literally watch the water running out the end of the timber is now measuring 18%.

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We went for excessive ventilation, it's got a 70cm netting strip all the way around all the sides at the base and netting in the doors at head height, plus I never got round to putting the main doors on yet so when the wind blows it does get inside :biggrin:.

 

I figured there is no way I could control the moisture in winter, it'll be as damp as the ambient conditions outside but at least the wood wont be getting rained on, and if we have some dryish days, then the good air flow should hopefully keep on top of it and maybe even dry it again.

 

I used to store wood in a shed with no ventilation but lifted off the ground and no double stacking. It used to take 2 years to get to the same condition as the wood in the tunnel this year that has taken 6 months. Air movement is everything.

The winter days will be fine its the nights that are the problem. Part of my day job requires

RH control of glass houses. We have very accurate monitoring and it is amazing to see the jump in RH as the sun goes down.

Air movement is what you need when the RH is at a level to take the moisture but look at the

graph and you will see the result of 100% RH. By having a open tunnel in the winter you are

feeding moisture into the logs exactly opposite to the summer good work. Condensation and

moisture laden air will increase the MC of your wood at night in winter.

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The winter days will be fine its the nights that are the problem. Part of my day job requires

RH control of glass houses. We have very accurate monitoring and it is amazing to see the jump in RH as the sun goes down.

Air movement is what you need when the RH is at a level to take the moisture but look at the

graph and you will see the result of 100% RH. By having a open tunnel in the winter you are

feeding moisture into the logs exactly opposite to the summer good work. Condensation and

moisture laden air will increase the MC of your wood at night in winter.

 

As one of the most experienced people on the Forum in relation to humidity variables, would you suggest even green timber will fail to dry at all at night even with optimum airflow passing the timber?

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As one of the most experienced people on the Forum in relation to humidity variables, would you suggest even green timber will fail to dry at all at night even with optimum airflow passing the timber?

If you consider a winter night with 100% RH which most are then from the graph it looks like wood will dry down to just under 30%

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If you consider a winter night with 100% RH which most are then from the graph it looks like wood will dry down to just under 30%

 

I think the lowest we can get small size down to in winter is 22.5% in perfect drying conditions with night-time RH at 90% and daytime lower of course. I was initially surprised by this.

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I think the lowest we can get small size down to in winter is 22.5% in perfect drying conditions with night-time RH at 90% and daytime lower of course. I was initially surprised by this.

 

That sounds about right. It varies obviously but in rainy Cornwall an average day is around 80% by day going to 100% at night. I expect inland should be a bit drier but I still would expect several nights near 100% RH.

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That might be the science but it's not the reality.

Wood takes back in moister over the winter months!

 

It most certainly is the reality - the only moisture which wood can take back in is that which physically lands on it - either in the form of rain or ground contact - or in the form of condensation.

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It most certainly is the reality - the only moisture which wood can take back in is that which physically lands on it - either in the form of rain or ground contact - or in the form of condensation.

 

The originally kiln dried 100% perfect slow grown, knot & totally defect free A1 grade Finnish spruce that's been in my loft for 15 years is damper in the winter than the summer.

 

That's from moisture drawn from surrounding air...

 

spiral

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