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Amelanchier

Rescue at 2009 Finals

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Been thinking about the rescue event on the way home last night after the comp.

 

The scenario was to rescue a non responsive chap hanging off a pair of ascenders on a footlock line. The ascent options were the access line up the back of the tree or the victims line itself.

 

Now I decided that given the fact that the casualty couldn't communicate, he couldn't tell you [the rescuer] whether he'd fallen onto the ascenders and possibly damaged his lines.

 

Also I thought that given that there was a dedicated access line in the tree - would it not be best practice to use it? Thereby keeping yourself seperate [in terms of systems] from the casualty until the last minute with a second / different anchor point...

 

Anyhow, I timed out because I'm slow and faffed around too much! :D And the most points were scored by climbers who footlocked up under the casualty (Well done Alex - still got a masterclass or two in you yet!). So in terms of speed and efficiency perhaps there is a benefit? Straight line A - B and all that...

 

Just thought I'd share my thoughts. :D

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Rupe   

I did the same Tony, I used the seperate access line for the same reasons. Even if you knew the other line was ok when it was set you couldn't be sure it was ok now, plus he was ascendign on ascenders not a footlock strop so damage was possible.

 

Also if he passed out on his way back up after lunch ( that was the scenario) then if he came too durign the rescue he would probably be sick, so I'd prefer not to be under him. I didn't say that though cos I was too busy faffing around and ran out of time too!

 

Whatever best practicve may be, I think that usign the casualties line proved to be the most efficient and some of the rescues were superb. An interesting scenario and experience all round!

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I agree with you there rupe using the casualty’s line did prove to be very effective in some instances. However I felt that the difficulty came from having to lift the casualty onto your system, being more complicated and needing a lot of gear.

 

Also its worth remembering in a real situation the casualties line may well be the only line in the tree and if Paul had his way I think it would have been the only feasible option.

 

Having said that I was surprised at how many people did use the casualty’s line, some were very effective and good to watch with some innovative techniques.

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In terms of best practice though, if there was an unused access line in the tree - would you not be expected to use it?

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Bundle 2   

Its a difficult thing to make hard & fast rules beyond the obvious statement that "best practice" should be deployed.....if you knew the casualties rope to be defective, you wouldnt/couldnt use it in a real rescue with any certainty or confidence. Best practice advice must be in line with training which , I believe, would have you install a rescue line.....Does this help?

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I thought the rescue was really interesting. A good learning curve as this could easily happen at work, except I wouldnt have had all morning thinking of a way to rescue him! Great to see some really different rescues going on.

 

I also went up the seperate access line for the same reasons on the assenders, because in a real rescue I wouldnt put myself in danger by accessing a line i had no idea what had happened. Also if he was on a footlocking strop would anyone have thought differently about it? I think i would still be warry about the knot loosening as i was working around him and then his weight on top of my system....bad move!

 

In a real rescue however you would have used the seperate access line, decended to casualty attached to your static line and cut his...but dont think Paul was too keen on that one!

 

Maybe best practise would be install your footlock line onto a floating anchor then you could have lowered from the ground. Maybe too easy for the comp though!

 

I really enjoyed seeing lots of techniques. Good One.

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Rupe   

I'm not sure if "best practice" exists does it? As a rescuer you have to make a decision fast and do what you think best at the time.

 

 

If it does exist then using the seperate line shoul dbe better, but if that wasn't there then use the footlock line. If the casualty was on a footlock strop then maybe you could have pulled left and right lines alternativley and "worked" him to the ground? Risky but it would work in an emergency!

 

Both methods were fine. I don't think points were awarded either way for choice of method but were awarded for application/success of chosen method.

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