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johnsonjack_81

15ft Yew...what should I do?

Question

I have recently bought a new house and there is a 15ft Yew outside my house (within the boundaries of my wall). It blocks light and I would like to either:

 

- completely uproot it

- trim it to about half the size

 

I have been warned against both for different reasons. Someone told me not to completely remove it because it could cause the land to sink where the roots extend to (Its about 4m away from my front door). Also that the roots are sucking up lots of water which could lead to excess water beneath my house??

 

Also been told that cutting it back by half would be difficult and it could take years before it goes green again.

 

What would you advise?

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such a small tree will not have the biggest roots so the suggestion of land sinking should not be a problem.

 

if it's really in the way then uproot it as trimming it back will still have it in the way no mater how you look at it.

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British geological society website will give you a rough guide to see if you are on clay. That would be a good start point. That will determine the potential for heave and subsidence.

 

Post a few photos of the tree for us to gauge a reasonable response.

 

The Yew responds well to pruning and will re-sprout very well so do not feel to pressurised in to keeping it at a certain height/width.

 

Annoyingly you bought the house knowing the tree was there and subsequent consequences so why did you buy the house in the knowledge that the tree will go? It is a real question and I am genuinely curious. I experience this all the time - the tree was there first so why destroy it?

 

Cheers

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Annoyingly you bought the house knowing the tree was there and subsequent consequences so why did you buy the house in the knowledge that the tree will go? It is a real question and I am genuinely curious. I experience this all the time - the tree was there first so why destroy it?

 

Cheers

 

I guess we are not all as perfect as yourself.... If you get annoyed about such things...:001_rolleyes:

 

To be fair its true that The other side of the coin is humans are also the worst locust like specie on the planet.

 

If you don't live a life that has no impact on the environment yourself, No cars, chainsaws, cement, plastic, timber from unsustainable resources etc. etc Then I guess your condemnation of a civilian asking a question comes from a solid & true position from a true heart.

 

But If not , then why criticise some wanting to remove a tiny little yew sapling in their garden?

 

I doubt if the earth will tremble at it loss. Its taking bigger & more important hits every day sadly.

 

Its not really a veteran, or even mature? might be home to a few soiders at best? just a little garden sapling... Wouldn't even keep the fire going for a night...

 

spiral

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I cut back several such yews in my garden when I moved in. They resprouted and looked good within 2 years. The risk of heave is massively overstated and as others have said, a small tree so I'd ignore that risk.

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Thank you for your honest response. I have no issue with your values and comments. I merely asked as it is becoming a common-theme and wondered what made you do what you are doing. No disrespect intended; not my style.

 

Your comment regarding the size and value of your tree makes me smirk though. My in-laws won't recycle anything with a retort of 'what difference will our contribution make?'

 

Good job we don't all think like that :confused1:

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Thank you for your honest response. I have no issue with your values and comments. I merely asked as it is becoming a common-theme and wondered what made you do what you are doing. No disrespect intended; not my style.

 

 

 

Your comment regarding the size and value of your tree makes me smirk though. My in-laws won't recycle anything with a retort of 'what difference will our contribution make?'

 

 

 

Good job we don't all think like that :confused1:

 

 

Well put

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Arbtalk

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Thank you for your honest response. I have no issue with your values and comments. I merely asked as it is becoming a common-theme and wondered what made you do what you are doing. No disrespect intended; not my style.

 

Your comment regarding the size and value of your tree makes me smirk though. My in-laws won't recycle anything with a retort of 'what difference will our contribution make?'

 

Good job we don't all think like that :confused1:

 

 

 

Well put

 

Indeed, but rather misses the point I am not the original poster. :thumbup1:

 

But I do believe when one buys a property to make a home, One sapling lost is not so terrible.:001_smile:

 

As for your inlaws & myself, I suspect Ive planted rather more trees in many environments than they have? {Pure conjecture of course.}

 

Anyway, I am sure we both love trees,dogs, fresh air,clean water stc.etc. :thumbup:

 

Regards,

Spiral

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I wouldn't have described a 15ft yew as a sapling, it would be a very very expensive tree to replace like for like

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Arbtalk

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It surprises me some times how upset people on here get when a home owner wants to take a tree down on their property for whatever reason.

 

How many of us have refused to remove a tree on moral grounds?

 

I'm sure some have but I'd bet they've also removed perfectly healthy specimens with decades of potential to pay the bills.

 

I can understand peoples frustrations in some cases but a 15 ft yew?

Edited by kev7937
I'm an illiterate fool.

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I have recently bought a new house and there is a 15ft Yew outside my house (within the boundaries of my wall). It blocks light and I would like to either:

 

- completely uproot it

- trim it to about half the size

 

I have been warned against both for different reasons. Someone told me not to completely remove it because it could cause the land to sink where the roots extend to (Its about 4m away from my front door). Also that the roots are sucking up lots of water which could lead to excess water beneath my house??

 

Also been told that cutting it back by half would be difficult and it could take years before it goes green again.

 

What would you advise?

 

I would advise you to hire a qualified arboriculturist :001_smile:

It sounds as though you have had some advice given to you by people who don't really know what they are talking about fully.

removal of trees can cause problems with subsidence and more rarely ground heave, however there are some investigations that can be done to estimate the likelihood of this, the water demand of the tree? and clay content of the soil? are main factors.

Yew is generally a very tolerant species to hard pruning and reduction by half although quite severe in tree pruning terms will have a good chance of surviving and grow back without much issue.

 

regards M

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