Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
csservices

Pitch canker?

Recommended Posts

Spotted this on some scots pines on a job today snd best guess I've found on google is pitch canker, the trees are showing signs of die back in the canopy too, just wondered what everybody else thinks?

 

Sent from my GT-I9305 using Arbtalk mobile app

1399658021143.jpg.68fcd3777cd7af0df18e50439875ea96.jpg

1399657989371.jpg.78e7746ed8c8e2c9deef6b76d67f7942.jpg

1399657968559.jpg.981d4c11ccca4ec4f4658b9421630dc3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul, yep theres browning of the needles and on of the trees some of the branches only have clumps of needle at the very tips

 

Sent from my GT-I9305 using Arbtalk mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We though to start with the fitst two pics were phyical injuries but those are two seperate trees and both are also shiwing die back in the canopy, there are 4 in total showing the same symptoms and a fifth which is already completely dead

 

Sent from my GT-I9305 using Arbtalk mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many causes to dieback. Pics of canopy would be useful.

 

If a machine got close enough to wound the trunk, it compacted the soil, for instance.

 

Tree pests are primarily primates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed , Everything i've read up so far seems to refer to it getting to europe and found 1 old observer article about outbreaks found here in Uk. If it does turn out to be the canker every article seems to be into not transporting the infected wood around. The Californians are big on it...

 

Has anyone else come across it in the British isles ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Treeseer if we're back on that job I will try and get some pics of canopy, Andy there is also a Guardian article referring to it from 2012 and also articles from Defra and the FC but neither have pictures and most of the information seems to be lifted straight from the American work on the disease with no pictures for reference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simply take a sample of the suspected infection wood to your nearest plant pathology ag laboratory for confirmation of the presence of the pitch canker fungus. Then present that report to your client if positive?

 

They'll think you're a pro arborist or somethin.

 

Jomoco:001_smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.