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County - lighten up mate - my post was written with tongue firmly in cheekand was intended to convey my utter agreement with your point. Our thoughts on this matter are completely aligned but it is as ever unlikely that common sense will prevail

 

I have indeed prepared and submitted a Forest Plan and we have two separate felling licences valid at this moment in time.

 

For the life of me I cannot see why we need any more beaurocracy or certification for firewood produced in the UK - but unfortunately I think we will get it.

 

I am sorry my attempt at humour was apparently lost on you :biggrin:

 

Cheers

mac

 

Hi Mac, sorry. Glad we agree :thumbup: I bet the powers that be have very little forestry background so common sense probably wont prevai:thumbdown:l.

 

I looked over a 3000tonne standing sale the other week and the guy looking at buying it said he could shift a lot of the sawlogs to Europe not the uk market. and its not FSC but they really don't seem to mind as long as its millable

 

cheers

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Anyone know how easy it is to get an untouched woodland classified as (RHI) sustainable and what sort of management plan would be needed. Have the ability to acquire 15 acres of land probably half being felling sized weeds the other half suitable for planting.

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This is more of a rant than looking for answers but if anyone can enlighten me feel free as I'm rapidly going off the whole idea of moving away from oil.

 

I'm an end user about to install a log gasification boiler and register for RHI payments. I'll be burning about 7-10tonnes a year. I have just been made aware of the BSL and the impending requirement for me to source my fuel from a BSL authorised supplier as of Autumn 2014.

 

I do not own woodland but there is a good local supply. I intend on buying both green wood, to process myself, and ready processed seasoned wood. I'll also be getting waste wood from local joinery businesses. My farmer neighbour has woodland and is happy to sell me standing wood to chop whenever I like. He has no interest in being a wood producer as a business, he's a beef farmer so he's not interested in BSL.

 

I call a large local long established woodland estate for prices on seasoned and unseasoned wood. I happen to casually mention BSL and they say they've never heard of it. As it turns out most log suppliers around here, Lincolnshire, know nowt about it.

 

This appears to leave me in a potential predicament! If I am to get RHI payments am I forced to get wood fuel from someone that is BSL authorised but could be 100 miles away? That'll add a good quantity of diesel derived CO2 to the air.

 

Do I become a BSL Self-Supplier as I will be processing my own wood fuel and using waste wood? According to the Questions & Answers I would be a Producer-Trader. But I won't be selling. I'll have to prove sustainability, CO2 emissions, submit quarterly reports ..... and the government is trying to promote renewable energy?

 

Unless I am completely misunderstanding something here it seems to be complete and utter red tape bollocks.

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This is more of a rant than looking for answers but if anyone can enlighten me feel free as I'm rapidly going off the whole idea of moving away from oil.

 

I'm an end user about to install a log gasification boiler and register for RHI payments. I'll be burning about 7-10tonnes a year. I have just been made aware of the BSL and the impending requirement for me to source my fuel from a BSL authorised supplier as of Autumn 2014.

 

I do not own woodland but there is a good local supply. I intend on buying both green wood, to process myself, and ready processed seasoned wood. I'll also be getting waste wood from local joinery businesses. My farmer neighbour has woodland and is happy to sell me standing wood to chop whenever I like. He has no interest in being a wood producer as a business, he's a beef farmer so he's not interested in BSL.

 

I call a large local long established woodland estate for prices on seasoned and unseasoned wood. I happen to casually mention BSL and they say they've never heard of it. As it turns out most log suppliers around here, Lincolnshire, know nowt about it.

 

This appears to leave me in a potential predicament! If I am to get RHI payments am I forced to get wood fuel from someone that is BSL authorised but could be 100 miles away? That'll add a good quantity of diesel derived CO2 to the air.

 

Do I become a BSL Self-Supplier as I will be processing my own wood fuel and using waste wood? According to the Questions & Answers I would be a Producer-Trader. But I won't be selling. I'll have to prove sustainability, CO2 emissions, submit quarterly reports ..... and the government is trying to promote renewable energy?

 

Unless I am completely misunderstanding something here it seems to be complete and utter red tape bollocks.

 

 

That pretty much sums it up!

 

I got my approval through yesterday, its easy to get... just get certified, job done.

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This is more of a rant than looking for answers but if anyone can enlighten me feel free as I'm rapidly going off the whole idea of moving away from oil.

 

 

 

I'm an end user about to install a log gasification boiler and register for RHI payments. I'll be burning about 7-10tonnes a year. I have just been made aware of the BSL and the impending requirement for me to source my fuel from a BSL authorised supplier as of Autumn 2014.

 

 

 

I do not own woodland but there is a good local supply. I intend on buying both green wood, to process myself, and ready processed seasoned wood. I'll also be getting waste wood from local joinery businesses. My farmer neighbour has woodland and is happy to sell me standing wood to chop whenever I like. He has no interest in being a wood producer as a business, he's a beef farmer so he's not interested in BSL.

 

 

 

I call a large local long established woodland estate for prices on seasoned and unseasoned wood. I happen to casually mention BSL and they say they've never heard of it. As it turns out most log suppliers around here, Lincolnshire, know nowt about it.

 

 

 

This appears to leave me in a potential predicament! If I am to get RHI payments am I forced to get wood fuel from someone that is BSL authorised but could be 100 miles away? That'll add a good quantity of diesel derived CO2 to the air.

 

 

 

Do I become a BSL Self-Supplier as I will be processing my own wood fuel and using waste wood? According to the Questions & Answers I would be a Producer-Trader. But I won't be selling. I'll have to prove sustainability, CO2 emissions, submit quarterly reports ..... and the government is trying to promote renewable energy?

 

 

 

Unless I am completely misunderstanding something here it seems to be complete and utter red tape bollocks.

 

 

 

There's a consultation underway at moment, looks like arb a risings & wind blown may be exempt from the BSL ticket requirement. Have a look at this:

 

Dear RHI Stakeholder

 

SUSTAINABILITY CRITERIA FOR BIOMASS SUPPORTED UNDER RHI

You will be aware that in February 2013, DECC announced its intention to introduce sustainability criteria for biomass supported under the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). This included measures for the introduction of new criteria for sustainable forest management (the UK Timber Standard for Heat and Electricity, based on the UK Timber Procurement Policy (UK- TPP)), land criteria in line with the EU Renewable Energy Directive for other types of biomass, and the establishment of a greenhouse gas target.

 

Today, DECC is beginning a short, formal consultation on proposals for technical adjustments to the biomass sustainability provisions to ensure the criteria operate effectively across the Renewables Obligation and Contracts for Difference. Only proposals 3 (exemptions from the Timber Standard) and 4 (highly bio-diverse grassland) are relevant to the RHI.

 

The consultation document is available here: https://econsultation.decc.gov.uk/decc-policy/biomass-sustainability . Your views (on as many or as few of the consultation questions as you feel able to respond to) would be strongly welcomed.

 

PROPOSAL 3: To provide exemptions from the Timber Standard for certain categories of wood

 

We propose to exempt residues from arboriculture, diseased wood, and material removed for ecological reasons from the Timber Standard. In addition, we are aware that a number of stakeholders have suggested that wood and woody materials arising from ‘wind-blow’ should also be exempt. We are keen to collect more evidence in order to consider whether an exemption for wind-blow is practicable.

 

PROPOSAL 4 : To include ‘highly biodiverse grasslands’ to the list of protected land types

 

We are proposing to add ‘highly biodiverse grasslands’ to the sustainability land criteria applying to the use of solid and gaseous biomass under the RO and RHI, as we expect the European Commission to make this a Regulation in autumn 2014 for bioliquids.

 

HOW TO RESPOND

 

The consultation closes on 14 July. Responses can be sent via DECC’s electronic consultation portal at the following link: https://econsultation.decc.gov.uk/decc-policy/biomass-sustainability

Alternatively responses can be emailed to deccbiomass@decc.gsi.gov.uk or hard copies sent by post to us at:

 

Renewables Delivery Team at

Department of Energy and Climate Change

Area 2C

3 Whitehall Place

London

SW1A 2AW

Email: deccbiomass@decc.gsi.gov.uk

Tel 0300 068 6184/94

 

We look forward to your responses and hope to arrange some opportunities to engage with you on this consultation in the coming weeks.

 

Kind regards,

 

 

RHI Team

 

 

 

The original of this email was scanned for viruses by the Government Secure Intranet virus scanning service supplied by Vodafone in partnership with Symantec. (CCTM Certificate Number 2009/09/0052.) This email has been certified virus free.

Communications via the GSi may be automatically logged, monitored and/or recorded for legal purposes.

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Is it the case that wind blow and arb waste are not sustainable sources then?

i registered as a self supplier with my source being arisings from my tree surgery work and passed no probs so i would say that arb waste is sustainable

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i registered as a self supplier with my source being arisings from my tree surgery work and passed no probs so i would say that arb waste is sustainable

 

:dito:

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