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BeanWoody

Splitting maul/axe

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I think the head on the X27 is lighter, so it takes more downward force to split. The Toolstation maul did it more by weight.

 

 

I know what I'd rather swing all day!!

 

same as most of the reply's on here...

 

x27 any day!

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If you are swinging it all day doesn't it make sense to get a hydraulic one?

I have an old maul that I paid £17 donkeys years ago. Wasn't expensive but nor was it cheap back when I bought it (probably 25 years ago). Split an awful lot of logs with it but have not picked it up once since buying a hydraulic splitter.

 

Swinging an axe all day might well keep you fit but it does wear you out, and I mean that literally.

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The head is the most important part. Though the handle is a close second.

 

If it didn't have a handle the head would be pretty useless and if it didn't have a head it would be a stick :lol:

I bought a cheap fibre glass handled maul and broke a chunk out of the cutting edge in a piece of wood so I straightened the edge off with the angle grinder and tapered the head and it is now 10 times better than it was and doesn't stick any more. I usually swing it once then knock it through with a hammer if it hasn't split what I was hitting. I have a polypropylene handled felling axe that I bought for £1 from a flea market and it has been well used to good effect and I don't get hung up on what the best handle material is, wood, plastic or fibreglass they all do the job.

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I've built a lot of things over the years besides a fire whilst in the bush. Fences, shelters, windbreaks, crude washstands and once helped build a small dock. I've used a bunch of different axes and within my collection are a few I really like. For a wilderness trip I carry an Estwing hatchet https://bestoutdooritems.com/best-felling-axe/ in my daypack, a 28" 3 lb foresters style ax I got at a garage sale and a 24" tube frame bow saw from a hardware/camping supply store. The blade guard on the saw is a length of plastic tube with a slit and a couple 550 cord ties. A saw can be much more useful than an ax at times. On YouTube, there are a lot of interesting videos about comparing the quality of different axes, check out this video, I think it will not be superfluous.

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On 06/03/2014 at 13:05, sandspider said:

I think the head on the X27 is lighter, so it takes more downward force to split. The Toolstation maul did it more by weight.

I like my X27 but also think it a bit on the light side. Great feel to the handle though, although a little perturbed to see it's hollow O.o

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On 07/03/2014 at 14:02, BeanWoody said:

Also been looking at the new style (fibre glass) Husqvarana splitting axe - has anyone tried one yet?

My son tried out their range in NZ recently and rated them highly,

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