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Novozymes products.

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Swooop   

Anyone had any experience with these? I've used quite a bit of mycorrhizal feed on sports turf and it's had excellent results, just wondering what their tree stuff is like? I'm sure I've got a sample pack somewhere, but just thought I'd seek some expert opinions.

 

Cheers

 

Swooop

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No experience of Novozymes products, but I would be sure to find out exactly what mycorrhiza is being supplied, and whether it is specifically associated with the target Trees species.

 

Are they endo or ectophytic for a start. Or just generic.

 

Would be interested to hear of what is being supplied, if you get the chance. :001_smile:

 

No alterior motive, other than to help my own awareness of where the trade is currently, in understanding and supplying these products

 

.

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Swooop   

Oooh, good stuff to throw in there monkeyd. I know a little about the turf grass stuff, a mix of endophytic mycorr and chicken manure, more research need for the tree stuff. Time to read the manual, thanks for giving me a direction.

 

Regards

 

Swooop

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Meep   

Morning :001_smile:

 

We use ALS Roots Mycorrhizae and it works really well, never normally used on its own but with correct soil fertilisation, back up with a soil sample you can really see the difference :001_smile:

 

Works really well as a preventative control.

 

Hope this helps :001_smile:

 

Meep

 

Turf Maintenance Products, SportsTurf and Horticultural Supplies and Products, UK (Go to Natural Solutions)

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Swooop   

Meep, thanks for the info and the link. Sorry it's been such a late reply, I had to buy a new keyboard as the old one decided I didn't need half the alphabet... Never was the most organised individual.

You're right about applying stuff backed up with knowledge from a soil sample, you never know where builders have dumped a ton of chalk until you have a look... Hopefully we should get some sent to the lab at the same time as some of our turf samples.

I've had a look at the Mycospikes we've been sent a sample of and the main mycorrhiza present appear to be pisolithus tinctorus and rhizopogon fulvigleba/villosuli, which are ectophytic I think... and there's the usual selection of 6-10-10, Fe and Mg.

It's all new to me, I've got some trees lined up to try things out on that need the help, we shall see how they do.

 

Regards

 

Swooop

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Are we talking about adding mychorrizal fungi spores to mature or newly planted trees? if we are talking mature, then adding mychorrizal spores is a waste of time, money and effort, rersearch papers have proven its snake oil, plus a large tree wouldn't have gotten large if mychor wasn't present, the trick is cultivate the mychor you already have... :001_smile:

 

P.S I must update my web site

Edited by Lee Winger

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Meep   
Are we talking about adding mychorrizal fungi spores to mature or newly planted trees? if we are talking mature, then adding mychorrizal spores is a waste of time, money and effort, rersearch papers have proven its snake oil, plus a large tree wouldn't have gotten large if mychor wasn't present, the trick is cultivate the mychor you already have... :001_smile:

 

P.S I must update my web site

 

Evening Lee,

 

I disagree with your above statement,

 

Now we should agree on the first part -:001_smile:

 

Mycorrhiza a naturally occurring fungi that has a symbiotic relationship with trees

The name means “fungus root.” It colonizes the roots of plants and extends itself into the soil so the plant can absorb additional nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrogen. In return, the plant releases sugars to the fungi that are produced by photosynthesis.

Through this process plants are more able to survive extremes in temperature, poor soil, soil compaction, neglect, and various other problems. Mature trees benefit from applications of the fungi if they are living in poor or compacted soil and do not have adequate resident populations of Mycorrhizal.

 

Now the bit we can disagree on.:mad1:

 

You’re not replacing the natural Mycorrhizal spores, but you are adding to them.

 

A really good analogy for this is a human can live on 1000 calories a day but what would happen if we try to compete in the Olympics? Some times you just need a bit more.

 

The problem with research is you can list 10 papers to say I dosen’t work and I can list 10 papers that say it dose work!!!

 

The Key is to make your own opinion on the matter, I believe the research that it does work, you believe the research that I dosen’t work

 

Meep

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Evening Lee,

 

I disagree with your above statement,

 

Now we should agree on the first part -:001_smile:

 

Mycorrhiza a naturally occurring fungi that has a symbiotic relationship with trees

The name means “fungus root.” It colonizes the roots of plants and extends itself into the soil so the plant can absorb additional nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrogen. In return, the plant releases sugars to the fungi that are produced by photosynthesis.

Through this process plants are more able to survive extremes in temperature, poor soil, soil compaction, neglect, and various other problems. Mature trees benefit from applications of the fungi if they are living in poor or compacted soil and do not have adequate resident populations of Mycorrhizal.

 

Now the bit we can disagree on.:mad1:

 

You’re not replacing the natural Mycorrhizal spores, but you are adding to them.

 

Yeah I know all that, I listern and learn from the leaders in this field, you ''cannot'' inocculate mature trees with Mychorrhiza succesfully, ask Andy Cowan, Ted Green and any knowledgable mycologists...cultivate what you have, thats the trick...

 

I havent seen one recent paper that praises mychorriza innoculation...

Edited by Lee Winger

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Meep   
Yeah I know all that, I listern and learn from the leaders in this field, you ''cannot'' inocculate mature trees with Mychorrhiza succesfully, ask Andy Cowan, Ted Green and any knowledgable mycologists...cultivate what you have, thats the trick...

 

I havent seen one recent paper that praises mychorriza innoculation...

 

 

Lee,

 

We are going to disagree again :001_smile: even thou I have the up most respected for Ted Green and love his work on Veteran tree management and could quiet happily spend all day listening to him talk about trees, he is not a leader in the field of Mycorrhizae.

 

And I won’t make any comment’s about Andy.

 

As far as I’m aware the world-leading expert on Mycorrhizae is Dr Don Marx.

 

Dr. Marx’s 40 years experience with the USDA Forest Service, he researched the practical utilization of mycorrhizal fungi to improve forest generation and reclamation in the US and abroad, and has authored over 230 scientific articles. An internationally recognized authority in forestry.

 

Dr. Marx is the recipient of the exclusive Marcus Wallenberg Prize (the Nobel Prize of Forestry), which was awarded by the King of Sweden (1991).

 

There have been 10’000 research papers Mycorrhizae, some are not going to agree with each other.

 

And your not going to change my mind, lets just agree the disagree on this matter.

 

Read a few of Dr. Marx papers there very good.

 

Meep

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D Mc   
We use ALS Roots Mycorrhizae and it works really well, never normally used on its own but with correct soil fertilisation...

 

I would like to interject a few thoughts on this discussion.

 

Through the many research papers applied to mycorrhizae an interesting side note has come to light. The relationship must be needed for the connection to be made. Fertilizing has been shown to interrupt the process. If the two subjects don't require the assistance of each other, they will not make the connection.

 

 

Mycorrhiza a naturally occurring fungi that has a symbiotic relationship with trees ...

 

Through this process plants are more able to survive extremes in temperature, poor soil, soil compaction, neglect, and various other problems. Mature trees benefit from applications of the fungi if they are living in poor or compacted soil and do not have adequate resident populations of Mycorrhizal.

 

Meep

 

Adding mycorrhizae to deficient or compacted soils is treated a symptom without correcting the problem. Lee's advice of nurturing the mycorrhizae through cultural means will have longer lasting benefits.

 

Discussions usually focus on the symbiotic relationship with trees and mycorrhizae, however, the soil biota is also dependent upon this relationship together working as a whole. Isolating individual portions of this equation may create only partial results and in some instances may interrupt the entire process.

 

Dave

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