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Tom D

Are we all rubbish?

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Not really the case.... Pick the job, pick the customer, walk away if you need to. I know it won't work for everyone, but I'd rather crack on with some work at home than go out and compete for a job that's not worth doing. I'd rather leave the downward competition on price to those that need to fight for it. I've quoted for a job and lost out to a company that had to travel >100 miles daily to the site, didn't have the benefit of local disposal of chip / timber etc. I can't understand how they broke even, they were well under what I'd take as bottom line and had considerably higher overheads... Crack on, I'll walk the dogs while the sun shines!

 

I don't win every quote no where near

But how does staying at home and it walking the dogs pay the bills lol?

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The problem I have is separating work from my private life.

The only stuff I really enjoy spending money is is new work gear, to make my life easier and more comfortable.

I consider servicing saws in the workshop as a recreational activity. Decent tunes, a can or two, I love it!

 

About time I got a bit of separation in there I think.

 

I'm exactly like you. What good would separation do? What will you do instead, waste your time/money taking the woman shopping? :laugh1::lol:

 

Count yourself blessed that your hobby also pays your living costs- many folk would kill to be able to go to work and enjoy it.

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As you may know I am a generator engineer qualified electrician and hgv mechanic. Average day turn over for me about £400 but often travel up to 100 miles each way. A lot of days in office organising jobs and quotes but good job could earn me £1000. I think the main problem for tree surgeons is the market is saturated and people are desperate for work. You need to hold your nerve when pricing. If you are on talking terms with your competition agree not to kill each other on price. If you get timber from site you shoulb be able to process and deliver 6 cubic metres in a day = £600 less expenses.

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Good thread anyhow chaps.For landscaping/countryside maintenance jobs, I follow the following formula:

 

Man days x £150 plus materials plus digger or tractor at £100 if required. Then the total has 20% added for profit.

 

This still doesn't make me enough- I was enjoying a couple of steaks on the log burner after work with my colleague tonight discussing this very issue. Ok, so we both can do pretty much what we want and own 50k of kit each outright. But that's sweet FA in real terms.

 

I'm thinking I need to be charging £200/day for a man. Thanks for this thread, Tom.

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You my friend are who I am talking about, see the correction above, you can't get top dollar every day, but you need to know when to charge more, and how to find the clients who will pay more. Stop thinking about a day rate and start thinking about a weekly or monthly target. You will be much better off.

 

£1800 a week is a pittance for the kit that you are supplying and the work that you are doing, try and get your head round getting £2500 a week, you won't hit that every week but aiming for it will get you closer, even if it gets you to £2k then thats £200 a week more than you had before, and thats £10k a year!, which will make a big difference to you and your family I bet.

 

this very simple idea took me from 60Kpa to 150Kpa in one year.

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Not really the case.... Pick the job, pick the customer, walk away if you need to. I know it won't work for everyone, but I'd rather crack on with some work at home than go out and compete for a job that's not worth doing. I'd rather leave the downward competition on price to those that need to fight for it. I've quoted for a job and lost out to a company that had to travel >100 miles daily to the site, didn't have the benefit of local disposal of chip / timber etc. I can't understand how they broke even, they were well under what I'd take as bottom line and had considerably higher overheads... Crack on, I'll walk the dogs while the sun shines!

 

Which is fine if you can affordto be picky. Or if there is enough work to choose the jobs you want to do.

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