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J A Mills and Sons

Horse logger available from spring 2014 for cordwood work

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We watched the Shire horse at Elvaston Castle fair this year and the ones pulling the dray round the grounds. They are fine animals.

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Nice to see horses working in the woods. Some big concerns:- The trees have been felled at a considerable height of the ground which is dangerous and a waste of good timber. Working with Blinkers does not allow the horse good vision in a work environment and a branch can snag behind damaging the eye!

You mention special shoes but those in the pictures are flats. (we have used heels and toes / screw in spikes)

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Nice to see horses working in the woods. Some big concerns:- The trees have been felled at a considerable height of the ground which is dangerous and a waste of good timber. Working with Blinkers does not allow the horse good vision in a work environment and a branch can snag behind damaging the eye!

You mention special shoes but those in the pictures are flats. (we have used heels and toes / screw in spikes)

 

Thankyou, all stumps left high on this job at land owners request he needed multiple anchor points after timber was cleared I believe he later removed them roots and all with a 360 machine, yep blinkers on all ours fulltime, I know of a few chaps who work with open bridels I think it's one of those issues, my self I prefer blinkers as In some cases they have saved damage to horses eyes ( but I do see the the open bridel boys augument :001_smile: just don't agree with it)

The shoes are a interesting one, because of the very varied work our horses undertake we copied a old design used by the old working horse contractors of old, the shoe consists of a trad flat,single clip, wide web shoe with 4x tungsten dome top studs set into them for road work, each shoe is also drilled and threaded in 6 places, 2 on each heal and two up front, this allows us to fit a variety of different working studs dependent opon conditions at the time but also allows the fitment of wedges and toe plates (of which I have several sets of varrying shapes and sizes again to suit conditions), we even have add on ware plates for long days on tarmac roads :biggrin:

We find these shoes to be just fantastic ! And we no longer have to worry about horses hurting themselves when not at work :001_smile: the flexibility this allows us is worth the £500 it costs for the full set of four + all the bits, we replace them every 8 weeks generally.

They are made for us by a very skilled tool maker and fitted by a good blacksmith.

I can pass on his details if you are interested yourself ?.

Jon

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Great to see the photos of the horses working. I'm interested in horse logging and would love to have the opportunity to see them in action. If you're back in Cornwall sometime it would be great to have a look, and maybe lend a hand with anything that needed clearing up etc. I'd bring the pasties and maybe even scones, cream and jam:001_smile:

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I help an old lady out with 'handyman' things in our village and she popped in yesterday to have a chat and pay me some £'s.

I know she likes to see working horses as she was driving her assortment of carts and traps locally during the 60's when there was very little traffic. (There's still a pretty little pre-war two wheeled trap in her barn) She is nearer to 90 than 80 now but still has a keen interest of horses in harness.

She was thrilled to bits to see the pictures of your work. Her biggest was a Percheron she told me. She's only 5' tall so that was quite something to imagine!

codlasher

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This is my friends sons Suffolk Punch mare and they also have a two year old stallion. Oli would love to try logging with them!

597666a0812fe_LadySuffolkPunch.jpg.dd8c279cec232bfbc4fb174d2ac63842.jpg

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£500 for a set of 4 shoes is a scandal. Time to find a new farrier. There are large shoes produced in Sheffield and Holland and it costs us £100 a full set installed! (These come with holes and need the threads making on a vise.

I will upload some pictures when on the PC as mobile doesn't work. :001_rolleyes:

 

Horse work is still viable in areas when machines struggle for access. The main problem is woodland managers using it as a PR scheme to keep themselves in a job. We like to purchase the wood standing and fell and extract then process into products.

 

Hard work but one cannot share lunch with a machine. :thumbup:

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