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Oil/Varnish for oak table

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What oil/varnish is best to use on an oak dining room table??? i want to keep its natural colour but make it fairly hard wearing at the same time. Help anyone??

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If you want it knock resistant, use varnish. Though even a clear varnish will have a slight yellow tint.

 

If you want to waterproof it and don't mind a slight tint, go for linseed. Boiled or plain makes no difference. Some say the boiled is more pure but it's really the same stuff and same price. The boiled just goes on a little easier.

 

If you want to waterproof it and don't want a colour change, go for Danish oil.

 

Whether it's varnish, linseed or Danish oils, a min. of three coats. If you varnish, remember to thin the first coat with white spirit. But don't go mad, you don't want it to be going on like water. If you use Danish oil, the first and second coat will result in a matt finish. The third will result in a very slight lustre. The more coats of Danish applied after a third coat, the deeped the lustre.

Edited by TGB

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What oil/varnish is best to use on an oak dining room table??? i want to keep its natural colour but make it fairly hard wearing at the same time. Help anyone??

 

 

I use Danish oil most of the time. Very easy to use, brush on or rub with rag. Build up the layers normally 6 to 7 and it gives a hard durable finish. Will stand hot cups and most spillages. Also like it if the finish dose get damaged its easy to sort the damaged part and you dont have to re do the hole table top.

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Safety note with Danish oil.

Between coats of Danish, do not expose used application clothes, brushes or tins to direct sunlight. Nor allow them to sit next to or on a heat source. Danish oil can spontaneously combust!

 

I've seen it happen twice. Once on a newly coated window frame. And once on clothes near the bottom of stairs being treated.

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What I did notice with Danish oil was the cost. I hadn't bought any for a few years then bought 5lt tin last year and the cost had increased from £28 To £52 Shop told me it was due to major fire at manufactures factory.:001_unsure:

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i'll second the poly-x vote. it is brilliant stuff as slackbladder said and the best thing is that most things just wipe off so for a dining room table its probably one of the best to use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What oil/varnish is best to use on an oak dining room table??? i want to keep its natural colour but make it fairly hard wearing at the same time. Help anyone??

 

For a truly hard wearing finish I would use a polyurethane varnish but it will darken the wood a bit also make sure it is the old fashioned polyurethane that needs white spirits to clean the brush. I would not use an acrylic varnish as these tend to go a slightly milky colour which would not suit oak. If you can cope with being slightly protective of the table I would go for an oil finish. My preference is the Liberon finishing oil but danish oil and tung oil are also good. I have found if you apply the finishing oil quite thick it is hot coffee cup proof but this might be more glossy than you want. These oil finishes will still mark if alcohol is left on the surface for any length of time (home made wine marked our top). I love linseed oil and it does give one of the most beautiful finishes over time but is very slow to dry and will need many coats before the table is well protected. I did one and it took about six months to get a deep build up and protection. I have no experience of the mentioned Osmo wax/oil but previous experience tells me that wax will not cope with heat well but am happy to be corrected on this. The big advantage with the oil finishes is it is easy to touch up any marks whereas if you damage a varnished finish you really ought to re do the whole top.

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