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RockingDad

Cherry Laurel.... some health questions!!!

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Hi, I've just found out the the tree i've cut up this afternoon to add to the pile is in fact cherry laurel!!! eek and panic after reading lots of death like descriptions regarding the cyanide poisoning etc! calming down a little can someone answer the following?

 

Can I chop/split and season this without risk and then burn it without any further risk to health?

 

How bad is the risk from handling this stuff? I understand its the crushing etc of the leaves that causes the problem, is there any issue with the chainsawing of the logs?

 

Now going slightly overboard, What should I do about the chipping from the chainsaw?

 

This may seem funny to some but with young children and pets I don't want to take any risks. The back of my jeep is currently filled with the chainsawed logs from chopping it up.

 

Thanks

 

RockingDad

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you will be fine if its burning in a woodstove with ok flue, ie doesnt fill room with smoke when you open door.

 

as an estate we have burnt many many tons of the stuff and all still here, both on woodstoves for home and on bonfire pile to get rid of it.

 

far as i understand burning leaves is worst part and if put through chipper and left in piles then raking the piles around by hand a week or so later isnt fun!

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Great firewood alright, we burn loads of the stuff, never had a problem. (seasoned in billet form for 12 months first). Most of the cyanide is in the fresh leaves, so make sure you aren't chipping down wind, or you can develop a sore head.

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Great firewood alright, we burn loads of the stuff, never had a problem. (seasoned in billet form for 12 months first). Most of the cyanide is in the fresh leaves, so make sure you aren't chipping down wind, or you can develop a sore head.

 

Agree with that:thumbup1:

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Cut a Laurel hedge today down to 7ft. What a distinctive smell from the chipping.

No sore head though, although I was wary.

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Cut loads of it yesterday, some was 12-14" so lots of logs for the owner, he has a wood burner so no probs there.

 

 

Sent from Outerspace.

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I've cut, chipped and burnt more laurel than I want to think about. Mate used to get a headache after a days constant chipping but then we'd been at it two months solid! Takes a while to dry I find. Also had a "forest arisings" fire of the stuff - pile was the size of a primary school; 400 tons went up in 3 days - the heat - my word! :lol:

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