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Matthew Storrs

Stock fencers- what order do you strain up?

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Netting first, I've got a drivall netting clamp, had it for years, clamp the netting in it, chain it to the loader on the tractor and reverse away til the netting stands up, nail it off, release tension and wrap off round the post, my local supplier has the cheap fence posts at front and 15 year guaranteed round the back at higher price, to be honest it all seems as bad as each other quite often the strainers are so wet and heavy you cant pick them up without chance of a hernia, finding decent quality fencing at a price where you can stay competetive seems to be biggest part of the job these days, I've took out posts that went in 20 years ago that are still sound and yet have had posts recently that havent been in 7 years and have rotted clean off :sneaky2:

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netting first but tend to leave all monkey strainers on untill i am happy with the tension then crimp them all off, i also use a small hand winch the tension netting between bpundary clamps as you get smaller increments of movement as opposed to the inch at a time with chain.

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The netting has to be strained first, the top strands are only ever strained to just bellow the same tension of the netting, a straining gauge is always a good investment and they are simple and quick to use....

 

As to the comments about box strainers, I know its gonna be hard to believe but a properly constructed diagonally strutted strainer is actually much stronger than a box strainer, the only exception to that is in marshy or boggy ground but even then I've yet to see one put in correctly. They work by creating an equal pull on both posts, when the netting isn't perfectly level with the top horizontal post they are simply not functioning how they should and they slowly fail and slacken. Box strainers are preferred because they are much easier to do and they are what people expect to see, I've had farmers tell me that their grandfathers put box strainers in so that's what they want... their grandfathers also used horses but they don't sell their tractors!

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Would say there is no right or wrong way. Personally I do a bottom wire, post it then stay it, then a top wire which is the same height as top of netting then net it, then a plain/barb or hot wire above.

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Started using gripples just recently, really good, I like the idea of straining up in the middle and I can always restrain later. I've not had much luck with gripples on barb though, seem to work fine on the ht barb but not on heavy barb even though I use the larger version gripple.

Normally strain the netting first then top strands, seems to make setting heights easier, but as has been said by many, we all have our own ways.

The problem of posts rotting off early seems to be getting worse, we've had gate posts crack off after 5 years.

Mate of mine near Wareham is getting a hot/cold creosote plant going, reckon he could be on to a winner, using DF or similar should get a premium price for a quality product.

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Hmmm i suppose it's diifferent strokes and all that but we put a straining wire on first then net, posts then barb. Depends on how far between straining posts gradients etc but what i will say is the first time i saw a quick fencer in action i was convinced on the spot that there is no faster easier way of putting up stock fencing ever!! Makes it look soooooo easy !!!

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As to the comments about box strainers, I know its gonna be hard to believe but a properly constructed diagonally strutted strainer is actually much stronger than a box strainer, the only exception to that is in marshy or boggy ground but even then I've yet to see one put in correctly. They work by creating an equal pull on both posts, when the netting isn't perfectly level with the top horizontal post they are simply not functioning how they should and they slowly fail and slacken. Box strainers are preferred because they are much easier to do and they are what people expect to see, I've had farmers tell me that their grandfathers put box strainers in so that's what they want... their grandfathers also used horses but they don't sell their tractors!

 

 

 

Can't agree, sorry. I can put a nice angle strut up morticed in as tight as you like. But a box strainer is longer lasting as there is much more to rot before it can give. It's not critical where the netting is, so long as there's a pull on the top of the post it will pass that to the second post and back to it's bottom via the wire. Only if the posts are not set properly will they move.

 

Recently I've been using wire tension strainers to 40mm angle iron in the ground on some really steep hills. Much better than wooden struts- as the posts rot slowly you just tighten the tence up and also the tension strainers. Also, if you run the tension strainer wires to the top and bottom of posts, it will still be standing when the posts rot off at the bottom. Plus you don't need to dig deep holes and compact well on tricky ground. Once tensioned correctly there is not a hint of post wobble, and the posts were like loose teeth to begin with. :thumbup1:

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Can't agree, sorry. I can put a nice angle strut up morticed in as tight as you like. But a box strainer is longer lasting as there is much more to rot before it can give. It's not critical where the netting is, so long as there's a pull on the top of the post it will pass that to the second post and back to it's bottom via the wire. Only if the posts are not set properly will they move.

 

Recently I've been using wire tension strainers to 40mm angle iron in the ground on some really steep hills. Much better than wooden struts- as the posts rot slowly you just tighten the tence up and also the tension strainers. Also, if you run the tension strainer wires to the top and bottom of posts, it will still be standing when the posts rot off at the bottom. Plus you don't need to dig deep holes and compact well on tricky ground. Once tensioned correctly there is not a hint of post wobble, and the posts were like loose teeth to begin with. :thumbup1:

 

anecdotal tales are great and I'm glad it worked out for you but all the tests conducted by various wire manufacturers that are supplied to the Fencing Contractors group show that diagonally strutted strainers are significantly stronger than box strainers in everything except marshy wet ground.

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