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Matthew Storrs

Stock fencers- what order do you strain up?

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seen lots of different techniques/ideas, what ever works best for ground levels/conditions is always best,were always learning mate, hi tensile always seems to fight you no matter what eh

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the bit about were always learning wasnt meant in a patronizing way btw, always picking up new tips as i go along

 

:001_smile: thats ok, Its one of those jobs where everyone seems to have there own methods, I guess as long as the outcome is good it doesn't really matter how it was done. i love it really, I can spend hours on you tube looking at different fencing machinery/techniques etc and i can never walk past a new stock fence without giving it a pluck to see how tight it is- drives my misses insane when were out on a walk!

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me too lol, the new zealanders seem to be very thourough with their work, watched a few you tube clips,they seem to favour 9 strands of wire rather than netting? nice fencing tho

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I think ideally you would have a strutted straining post every 50m atleast and at every turn or undulation but it seems the customer just go for cheap at the moment so its getting difficult to win jobs without cutting down on quality of work.:confused1:

 

yep, strain every 50 m , customers want everything done on the cheap, then moan when the fence fails..aarrggh

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One of my pet hates is high tensile wire. I always argue for quality galvanised instead and move up a size if possible

I know for a fact that in 25 years time some poor fellow (if they even care to) is going to have to pick up the pieces of HT wire. Not a pleasant job, nasty sharp, rusty little lengths just waiting to spring into your hand/leg and thats not even thinking of the animals it's supposed to keep in......:thumbdown:

Another thing to consider is the lifespan of the fence posts in relation to the wire used. Unless the posts are treated to BS 8417 with the WPA benchmark guaranteeing treatment fit for purpose you will be having post failure within four years....To me that is not acceptable.

codlasher.

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Isn't tornado ht galvanised? I quite like ht personally, a little more difficult to work with but find it stays nice and tight for longer. Found that mild steel tends to stretch

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