Jump to content
David Humphries

Chalara fraxinea - Generic thread

Recommended Posts

Is that because you are looking for die back and assuming it is Chalara, which of course it may, or may not, be.

 

Quite a few years ago, pre-Chalara, there was a study of die back in ash. I think it was conducted by Oxford University. It was suggested, if I recall correctly, that the reasons for the die back were to do with farming practices, particularly ploughing right up to the trees. The worst area in the country for the die back was around Newport Pagnell, I think.

 

The reason Chalara is now accepted as so wide spread is because people are looking for it, and finding it. But not all die back will be Chalara related. If you suspect it, then confirm it from the other symptons, not just die back.

 

Agrilus planipennis

 

I'm not sure how much resources the FC are putting into tracking Chalara. It's a lost cause in that respect. It's everywhere. Even if it's not shown on the DEFRA map it's only because no one has looked in those grid squares, according to the FC.

 

 

EAB, ALB, climate change, the list goes on. Well if none of those get them, I'll stand on my theory. :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i understand the nursery industry is trying to combat this outbreak - but what of contractors like me being part of the problem? who disinfects there machinery after contact with diseased trees, and how do you do it? last time i had to disinfect we used a fine spray methylated sprit disinfectant on the chipper. Any one who like to add to this method?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quite a few years ago, pre-Chalara, there was a study of die back in ash. I think it was conducted by Oxford University. It was suggested, if I recall correctly, that the reasons for the die back were to do with farming practices, particularly ploughing right up to the trees. The worst area in the country for the die back was around Newport Pagnell.

 

Commonwealth Forestry Institute (CFI) Occasional Paper No 24 by Dick (R.G.) Pawsey Ash Dieback Survey

 

Radcliffe Science Library | Oxford Digital Library for Forestry

 

Follow the links (it's not immediately obvious which links) and you can download it from the Bodleian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting it bad in west wales now. Just back from a drive through llanwnen, llanllwni, brechfa, nantgaredig. Very bad, really horrible to see. In my woodland there seem only a few trees that are unaffected as yet.

Does anyone have any info on how the larger branches break down? I plan to leave a lot standing for ecological value but have concerns about safety near tracks. Ash which died of other causes up to 10 years ago still have good standing inner crown structure but chalara seems to make the twiggy growth very brittle. How does this translate to larger branches im wondering? Any thoughts?

Cheers...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a reflection of the distribution, I witnessed chalara on my travels last week at 3 seperate sites across the south and east of the U.K.

 

Where I work at an open space in north London,

image.thumb.jpeg.583fd72d7b7dbc7b5815413ca14c612e.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.344d271e7fdd1ae6d1998fd2962342fc.jpeg

 

At the 800 year old continuous coppice of Bradfield woods near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk

image.thumb.jpeg.2abbb19099fb36de3abc64423370eb4e.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.ff2a500f55709353688cfeb1dea2421e.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.f2133c979a63134ec3bbb1e7b58e6b23.jpeg

 

and on the chalk down lands of Lyscombe and Highdon in Dorset whilst on an ATF field trip.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.6024046883d6a7b919a0fd48d03cb4c5.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.806ad2caf44f28e3b6430b4b5800c621.jpeg

 

.........depressing

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We're probably a few years behind you up here, but this year it's taking off.

 

It's currently only apparent on self set saplings, coppice and other regen growth, but it's widespread.  Last weekend I was on sites in St Helens and Macclesfield and noted it on both and travelling between.  It's certainly going to change the landscape.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was walking around the hills Settle, North Yorkshire, earlier this spring and all (and I mean all) the areas of Ash regen were affected.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×