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renewablejohn

Horses for logging

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Can any horse loggers advise. Do logging horses have to be heavy shires or can other horses do a similar job. Reason for asking is I have two horses which need exercise but I cannot ride and my daughter who used to ride them is going to Mauritius to live. I could sell to a dealer but they have become part of the family and I would rather loan them but dont want the risk of injury if the horse throws them off. Just thought loaning to a horse logger might be a viable alternative but then I dont know much about horses.

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Absolutely dont have to be Shires or traditional heavy breeds . Its whats between their ears or temperament thats critical . Its just that these traditional heavy breeds have been bred for centuries for work so makes sense if your serious about it to choose something of that ilk .

You dont say what you actually have which makes it difficult to say what road to take but i would bet leasing out to a horse logger a poor choice for various reasons . I would loan them out to a trustworthy rider or get someone in to keep them semi fit and doing something . Carriage driving may even be a better option ? You could easily learn that yourself and is good fun . :001_smile:

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Can any horse loggers advise. Do logging horses have to be heavy shires or can other horses do a similar job. Reason for asking is I have two horses which need exercise but I cannot ride and my daughter who used to ride them is going to Mauritius to live. I could sell to a dealer but they have become part of the family and I would rather loan them but dont want the risk of injury if the horse throws them off. Just thought loaning to a horse logger might be a viable alternative but then I dont know much about horses.

 

 

Never been a horse logger, I just went in with the Holders when the show was finished ;-). Never had to put a Holder down either.

 

I would have been happy to do a bit with the kids' shetlands or the later highlands but wouldn't give a section Acob much chance of not damaging itself.

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Thanks born2trot. Not thought of carriage driving but that does sound expensive. Horses are a section 2 welsh cob and a stocky arab cross both with very quiet temperaments. We have tried finding a trust worthy rider but the market at the moment is very depressed to such an extent that riders are demanding not only the horse but a contribution to its upkeep. I dont really want to sell to a dealer as you hear of some really cruel cases and the alternative glue factory is a poor end for such nice horses.

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They don't have to be heavys, but weight pulls weight. Also, the training of a logging horse takes considerable time to achieve, it is not simply a case of hitching a log and getting on with it.

I personally would think long and hard about what to do, I once sold a horse to a dealer, saw him again three months later and cried like a baby for an hour, I bought the horse back just to put him down, never again will I do that. Very often, horses that do not have a specific role/use in life just get passed from dealer to sale/dealer and end up having a pretty miserable existance.

I would have a horse put down, rather than just passing it on to absolve my guilt, (not saying that you are doing that), it's a hard decision but better than what could happen.

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Thanks born2trot. Not thought of carriage driving but that does sound expensive. Horses are a section 2 welsh cob and a stocky arab cross both with very quiet temperaments. We have tried finding a trust worthy rider but the market at the moment is very depressed to such an extent that riders are demanding not only the horse but a contribution to its upkeep. I dont really want to sell to a dealer as you hear of some really cruel cases and the alternative glue factory is a poor end for such nice horses.

 

The breeds you have are very commonly used for carriage driving . You can make it as cheap or as expensive as you want ( i built my own two wheel cart ). £200 tops will get you started . Go along to your local carriage driving events and get talking to people , i'm sure they'll be more than happy to show you the ropes . You never know it could be the start of a great partnership ! :blushing: ( horses ) :biggrin:

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Shows how much I know of horses its not section 2 its a Section D Welsh Cob and a 14 hand welsh cross arab. If it was upto me they could carry on grazing the fields the same as they have done for the last 5 years.

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I would find a good private home for these animals. (Contact the local BHS)Logging needs considerable training from a young age and much time.

 

We have used the Clydesdale breed as much bulk with strong legs but nimble like a light horse compared to Shires.

 

The best one we had since 4 and is now 21. Works on long reins and with voice control.

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