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Congrats on the baby, and all the best to your wife from me and my other half, when my son was born we almost lost him at a month old, not the same but I'm ever gratefull for the quick response from the hospital staff and the paramedics. Without them I wouldn't have him.

 

I give blood ever time. I'm A resess negative, or however it's written, all I know is it's rare and I would like to think there is some rare blood ready if I ever have an accident.

 

And let's face it we are all in danger of loosing blood as we all use chainsaws, if it be for carving, or working, with or without a ticket, cut your arm off and the first thing you will need is the red stuff.

 

Richard

 

many thanks mate, hate to say it but i think from memory your blood groupmis one of the lowest stocks... the nhs said to me blood group 'o' has 20,500 units available, my blood group is ab positive but yours is even raerer than mine and my blood group has just 2,500 units available in east anglia! :thumbdown:

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your a gent and many thanks... oh and the biscuits have improved :thumbup1: you get mccoys crisps, penguin bars, lemon and orange squash, cups of tea now and lots more after donating :thumbup:

 

I remember the first time I gave blood I asked if it was OK that I'd had a drink the day before and they said that was no problem but I should avoid booze for 24 hours after. So I had to put that to the test. My advice......avoid booze for 24 hours after unless you want an experience similar to a bad acid trip.

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I remember the first time I gave blood I asked if it was OK that I'd had a drink the day before and they said that was no problem but I should avoid booze for 24 hours after. So I had to put that to the test. My advice......avoid booze for 24 hours after unless you want an experience similar to a bad acid trip.

 

i havent laughed so much in ages and i needed that mate... :lol:

thats brilliant!

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the surgeon said to me if my wfe had a home birth it would of been a different story.... and i know what you mean to the uh ok bit,.. but im learning and getting there i think :001_rolleyes:

 

Yeah, we were aware of the risks but it was one of those descisions, also risks in hospital etc. With the second one, we didn't have much choice, he was out in about 20 minutes.

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Yeah, we were aware of the risks but it was one of those descisions, also risks in hospital etc. With the second one, we didn't have much choice, he was out in about 20 minutes.

 

wow talk about getting on with it :lol:

 

safe to say im not having any more children mate and i aint putting my wife and family through that again! :biggrin:

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Wow, thats a drama that made me shiver reading it.

I cannot imagine how it must been for you.

Reading about this has made me even more annoyed with the French.

Why?

Because British subjects are not allowed to give blood:confused1:

WHY?

Because of the risk of contracting CJD (mad cow disease)

I'm not kidding!

I was a regular donor for years in the U.K

(anything for a pretty nurse, a bourbon cream and a cup of tea)

Then I moved here and one wet day rucked up at the local blood bank only to be humiliated in front of dozens of smug Onion Johnnies.

A Gallic shrug and a "Mai no Monsewer, vous ete...Anglais!"

Guess they just can't handle the high quality and potent rouge of a race honed by a millennium of spilling claret fighting the French... hhhhh :001_tongue:

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Wow, thats a drama that made me shiver reading it.

I cannot imagine how it must been for you.

Reading about this has made me even more annoyed with the French.

Why?

Because British subjects are not allowed to give blood:confused1:

WHY?

Because of the risk of contracting CJD (mad cow disease)

I'm not kidding!

I was a regular donor for years in the U.K

(anything for a pretty nurse, a bourbon cream and a cup of tea)

Then I moved here and one wet day rucked up at the local blood bank only to be humiliated in front of dozens of smug Onion Johnnies.

A Gallic shrug and a "Mai no Monsewer, vous ete...Anglais!"

Guess they just can't handle the high quality and potent rouge of a race honed by a millennium of spilling claret fighting the French... hhhhh :001_tongue:

 

im just looking at the positives mate, got my little boy... but i didnt know the french were like that! :thumbdown:

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Wow!!

 

That is one frightening and incredible story at the same time.

 

A groundsman I used to work with had a very similar story. It was a while ago now but I think what happened was shortly after giving birth her iron levels dropped to a dangerous low level to the point she nearly died also. The doctors managed to win her life though and they had a healthy baby girl :).

 

My mum is a nurse and I know she has helped many people through severe illnesses. Job satisfaction does not get any better than that and I'm very proud of her as are the many family members of patients she has helped over the last 11 years. A nurse can become a closest friend to those suffering long term and sadly there isn't always light at the end of the tunnel. She normally attends the patients funerals when this is the case through invite from the families.

 

I can't help but feel angered when people slate the NHS or the fact that of footballers, fireman, police and nurses they are the lowest paid.

 

Congratulations on the birth of your son :D. I wish you as a family all the very best for the future.

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Wow!!

 

That is one frightening and incredible story at the same time.

 

A groundsman I used to work with had a very similar story. It was a while ago now but I think what happened was shortly after giving birth her iron levels dropped to a dangerous low level to the point she nearly died also. The doctors managed to win her life though and they had a healthy baby girl :).

 

My mum is a nurse and I know she has helped many people through severe illnesses. Job satisfaction does not get any better than that and I'm very proud of her as are the many family members of patients she has helped over the last 11 years. A nurse can become a closest friend to those suffering long term and sadly there isn't always light at the end of the tunnel. She normally attends the patients funerals when this is the case through invite from the families.

 

I can't help but feel angered when people slate the NHS or the fact that of footballers, fireman, police and nurses they are the lowest paid.

 

Congratulations on the birth of your son :D. I wish you as a family all the very best for the future.

 

many thanks mate and great post! it was to do with her iron levels also but we got there in the end :thumbup1:

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Wow. I'm sorry that sounds awfull. I used to give blood but haven't for a few years now. I'm going to start doing it again

 

Congratulations

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