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David Humphries

Massaria on the March

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That's a large branch to have decay on the tension side! I pruned a tree in Yeovil last summer and noticed how unusual the crown was. After closer inspection I realised that decay was setting in on almost every branch and limb. Researched it and confirmed Massaria but unfortunately nothing was done that I'm aware of. I read that pdf David and it was very interesting. It seems that planes are notorious for surviving in such harsh conditions but are now being attacked by a bacteria and their poor plant health is a contributing factor.

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Just research by myself. It had all the classic signs. Dieback of the upper cambium with decay in a 'v' shape toward and into the heartwood. Legions and oozing of the bark and the stripe. Branches became very brittle against its normal wood characteristics and much debris all over the floor before we arrived of a significant size. As it must my first time of seeing it is wasn't sure how bad it was, is it the norm, to see a tree with so much damage? I'm talking practically most of the crown.

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Not really in my experience Jake.

 

It's possible that there was more going on with your tree and that there may have been a number of pathogens and environmental issues in action.

 

What was the ground like?

 

Compaction, moisture issues, salt damage?

 

 

 

.

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Ground was very compacted I'd say (although not tested) on one side was a stone drive, although not overly used. A footpath on the other with grass around 50% of it. Approximately 10 metres away was a 18th century house. I had pictures to back this up but unfortunately the phone had crashed. I also remember and noticing a difference within the trees tip growth. It was very clustered and vigorous making branches very end heavy which was contributing to its failures. The growth reminded me (but not as thick) of whiches broom or mistletoe.

Edited by Jake Andrews

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Nice tree and setting Jake.

 

Would be interesting to see how it fairs over the next couple of growing seasons.

 

Branches with any level of Massaria infection all succumb eventually Ime

 

 

 

 

.

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Very interesting hearing of your experience as it's the first time I've seen it. I hope to be back over the coming years and will take pictures if I do.

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