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David Humphries

Massaria on the March

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Was this noticed whilst in the tree removing other ones David? Its a shame that it has to be removed ( although an absolute necessity I'm sure) as it would be interesting to monitor the rate of decay.

 

Removed as it was a hazard to an ongoing construction project.

 

We have many others of varying dysfunction that we monitor, as not all Massaria branches require removal depending on target.

 

 

 

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.........Is that a reaction zone stretching radially into (nearly) the core?

 

That's how I read it Chris, the dysfunction usually (but not always) progresses down the rays in a wedge shape toward the core, slowly spreading outward until there is little (then no) functional wood alive on the opposite side to where it starts.

 

 

 

 

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That's how I read it Chris, the dysfunction usually (but not always) progresses down the rays in a wedge shape toward the core, slowly spreading outward until there is little (then no) functional wood alive on the opposite side to where it starts..

 

Fascinating. Sometimes I really do wonder exactly how such strategies of colonisation developed. Is the angle of decay always quite similar, in your experience, or are some branches suffering from narrow decay columns whilst others, like this, quite broad?

 

Couldn't resist... :001_cool:

 

11boci.jpg

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Varies from what we see, if I get some time I'll post a series of cross sections showing different rates of decay progression at some point.

 

 

 

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By all means do, if you get the time. We have quite a few large planes where I work, with many along very busy main routes. May have to discuss how they're managed in terms of recognising that massaria is a potential issue. Currently, I can't imagine there are swift ways of picking up on such decay? I'm talking a line of 100+ planes, in one example.

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Easier when they're in leaf.

 

Options for survey inspections can include drones, pole cameras, mewps, climbing, but mostly ground based inspection.

 

 

You'll be aware of this LTOA guidance doc ?

 

http://www.ltoa.org.uk/documents/doc_download/193-massaria-disease-of-plane-practical-management-guidance

 

 

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Currently, I can't imagine there are swift ways of picking up on such decay? I'm talking a line of 100+ planes, in one example.

 

Once you get your eye in for spotting early stage Massaria it is quite straight forward to spot it. Just look for the changes in colour on the wood and bark, the flaking of the bark on the top of the branch and the characteristic pink, almost sunburnt colour. It easier to spot from the ground than most think.

 

On a sunny day the Massaria almost jumps out at you. My personal best is 134 Massaria inspections in just under 5 hours with 46 trees that required branch removals.

 

In the most recent pictures with the thin strip, that is very early colonisation and can take 3 months before it becomes advanced and hazardous.

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Easier when they're in leaf.

 

Options for survey inspections can include drones, pole cameras, mewps, climbing, but mostly ground based inspection.

 

 

You'll be aware of this LTOA guidance doc ?

 

http://www.ltoa.org.uk/documents/doc_download/193-massaria-disease-of-plane-practical-management-guidance

 

 

.

 

I shall read that. I am aware there was one, though never got around to reading it. That'll be one of the first things I do tomorrow!

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