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Mike Hill

Yew:How old do you think this one is?

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A mate of mine has this big Yew on his Farm.Its hollow and many of the Limbs are Hollow as well.If it tips over its going to block a track,he wants it down and we were wondering how old it might be?

 

Its about 50foot high and close to 7 foot at the base.

Yew.jpg.8f1afa18db71ab8e22827e93c50b3c7e.jpg

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blazer   

Some Yews in churchyards are estimated to go back to the Neolithic - can just see the post on abtalk 4,000BC - hey guys just brought an flint axe from a guy from Germany much better that the last one from Sweden:thumbup:

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James   

I promise I'm no tree hugger! But please can alternatives to felling be considered in this case? I'm happy to offer my services if required - this tree sounds like it's on its way to veteran if it's not there already, and if the only concern is one of potential failure I bet we could find a way to retain it at no extra cost to the owner :-)

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sloth   
I promise I'm no tree hugger! But please can alternatives to felling be considered in this case? I'm happy to offer my services if required - this tree sounds like it's on its way to veteran if it's not there already, and if the only concern is one of potential failure I bet we could find a way to retain it at no extra cost to the owner :-)

 

Ditto :thumbup: though I have been known to hug the odd tree...:D

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alex_m   

yeh please try and change his mind about felling! it could easily be between 1000 and 2000 years old. what a beauty!

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A mate of mine has this big Yew on his Farm.Its hollow and many of the Limbs are Hollow as well.If it tips over its going to block a track,he wants it down and we were wondering how old it might be?

 

Its about 50foot high and close to 7 foot at the base.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awesome tree Mike.....:thumbup1:

 

wonder how many tools have been made with that single tree in its life time?

 

yews sometimes are deceptive well From my XP anyway, there are a couple of yews in a church yard near me which date back 750 years around the size of your friends, then i have seen slightly smaller and the have dated to around 1000-1500 years, and complete opposite on another that was 8ft dia and 45ft tall dating only 350 years :001_huh:....be good to find out though.....

 

Thanks for sharing :thumbup:

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b101uk   

I would say there is ~150 years variance just in diameter vs. latitude >40 <65 vs. environment

 

So 300 years +- 75 years

 

If I had to nail a date based on ~7ft diameter in the UK it would be ~304 years with a potential range of 266 years in an old garden of an equally old house to 355 years if it grew with competition in woodland

 

 

 

 

but then what do i know :laugh1:

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