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David Humphries

Lightning damage & Fungi

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no, lightning strikes and forest fires are as old as the fungi that have evolved to take advantage IMO broken cells are broken cells.

 

That may be a correct generalisation of the natural world, but "urban, non climate specific" trees & fungi, have not had that association Tony. I think the instances of strikes in the human neighboorhood may be on the increase.

 

This may not be such a 'natural' event in general terms.

 

 

 

 

.

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That may be a correct generalisation of the natural world, but "urban, non climate specific" trees & fungi, have not had that association. I think the instances of strikes in the human neighboorhood may be on the increase. This may not be such a 'natural' event in general terms.

 

David,

Is this also true for urban trees in cities with high rise buildings or just for smaller towns with lots of open spaces, like it's the case in The Netherlands ?

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That may be a correct generalisation of the natural world, but "urban, non climate specific" trees & fungi, have not had that association Tony. I think the instances of strikes in the human neighboorhood may be on the increase.

 

This may not be such a 'natural' event in general terms.

 

 

 

 

.

 

Its not that strikes are on the increase, its just that trees are on the decrease and the ones left are at a higher potential risk from strike as the tallest object on the scene.

 

I have had the discomfort in breaking down a redwood that was obliterated by lightning, alongside it a cedar that had also been struck, the building close by also had a conductor. The seqioa had gotten to tall for its boots!

 

When I was in sweden I got a real eye opener to lightnings potential. We was driving through a very steep sided valley complete with lake both sides of the valley where wooded (spruce plantations) every now and then I could see a fire in the distance and thought it was work going on deep in the woods.

 

then we drove past one that was still smouldering from a strike that had occured not minutes before.

 

Think you might be seeing a bias as your worksite is on high ground.

 

though its just my opinion of course

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David,

Is this also true for urban trees in cities with high rise buildings or just for smaller towns with lots of open spaces, like it's the case in The Netherlands ?

 

 

I don't know Gerrit, I'm just putting across a point of view & experience of the trees I see around me.

 

 

Think you might be seeing a bias as your worksite is on high ground.

 

though its just my opinion of course

 

 

that would make sense if it wasn't for the fact that the three examples are all from the lowest points of the site.

 

The trees at the top of the Heath (appear) to be no more at risk than those lower down the hill, from what I've found.

 

 

.

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that would make sense if it wasn't for the fact that the three examples are all from the lowest points of the site. The trees at the top of the Heath (appear) to be no more at risk than those lower down the hill

 

In The Netherlands, the increasing number of strikes, especially on beech, is associated with air pollution (nitrification), because of which the ionisation and with it the electrical conduct capabilities of the (smooth) bark changes, with the sooner attraction of lightning as a result. See : lightning struck beeches.

Edited by Fungus

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In The Netherlands, the increasing number of strikes, especially on beech, is associated with air pollution (nitrification), because of which the ionisation and with it the electrical conduct capabilities of the (smooth) bark changes, with the sooner attraction of lightning as a result. See : lightning struck beeches.

 

Fascinating Gerrit.

 

nice pictures also.

 

Are the increases atributed to mostly smooth barked species?

 

These seem to be often the last trees species that (bark) dry after heavy rain.

 

 

 

.

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Are the increases attributed to mostly smooth barked species? These seem to be often the last trees species that (bark) dry after heavy rain.

 

David,

Yes, IME they are and especially those smooth barked species with a normally neutral, or at least not mainly with negative ions loaded bark surface.

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