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Advice on Forestry barn/Buildings

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Dear all. Can you please offer any advice.

I am looking to apply for planning permission to build some barn buildings to help with timber work in 22acre mixed woodland (*mainly undermanaged and overcrowded)...

Thinking of 3 structures. 1) shelter for mobile sawmill and dry covered workspace. 2) Big barn to store & maintain machinery & stack drying timber (also double up as bit of a workshop). 3) Barn to act as dry room for workers, and small office with compost toilet.

Also could do with a firewood drying barn but think that this could just be a temporary pole barn structure in a field?

 

Can anyone offer any advice on planning permission needed in national parks? Also what should I consider as essential in my buildings? I am felling 5acres of infected larch this winter which I want to process onsite & store for future firewood sales. What size barns do I need to make?

 

Also what do people suggest for roofing options?

 

Many thanks.

Doug

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Dear all. Can you please offer any advice.

I am looking to apply for planning permission to build some barn buildings to help with timber work in 22acre mixed woodland (*mainly undermanaged and overcrowded)...

Thinking of 3 structures. 1) shelter for mobile sawmill and dry covered workspace. 2) Big barn to store & maintain machinery & stack drying timber (also double up as bit of a workshop). 3) Barn to act as dry room for workers, and small office with compost toilet.

Also could do with a firewood drying barn but think that this could just be a temporary pole barn structure in a field?

 

Can anyone offer any advice on planning permission needed in national parks? Also what should I consider as essential in my buildings? I am felling 5acres of infected larch this winter which I want to process onsite & store for future firewood sales. What size barns do I need to make?

 

Also what do people suggest for roofing options?

 

Many thanks.

Doug

Hi Doug, weigh up your needs now and allow for future growth of your business-will you require more buildings in the future? also your planning proposal may get nocked down in size by the LPA so if you go in asking for slightly more than you require now, you should end up with what you want if its granted plus you havent got to build all the buildings at once it can, once and if permissions is granted, be done then to suit your needs and pocket.Talk to your planners, LPA, and engage your LPA tree officer,and your parish council ,it sounds like a reasonable proposal on the face of it, as for national parks i think they have there own planning department so maybe test the waters with them first. i am involved with my own LPA and have some knowlage of the way it works, but it does help if you know someone on the inside . hope that helps a bit.

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it sure is a minefield in them there parks ;)

Thanks for the response. I found a useful thread from dartmoorwoodcutter about his proposed timber drying barn, but find the whole planning technicalities rather complicated. What is a temporary structure... and what is operational development. If anyone knows of a cut and dry web-resource for structures and designs that would be immensely helpful.

All the best.

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Dear all. Can you please offer any advice.

I am looking to apply for planning permission to build some barn buildings to help with timber work in 22acre mixed woodland (*mainly undermanaged and overcrowded)...

Thinking of 3 structures. 1) shelter for mobile sawmill and dry covered workspace. 2) Big barn to store & maintain machinery & stack drying timber (also double up as bit of a workshop). 3) Barn to act as dry room for workers, and small office with compost toilet.

Also could do with a firewood drying barn but think that this could just be a temporary pole barn structure in a field?

 

Can anyone offer any advice on planning permission needed in national parks? Also what should I consider as essential in my buildings? I am felling 5acres of infected larch this winter which I want to process onsite & store for future firewood sales. What size barns do I need to make?

 

Also what do people suggest for roofing options?

 

Many thanks.

Doug

 

Ring the planning officer and talk it through with them. You don't want to be putting a lot of effort in and then get turned down. Planning officers will tell it like it is. Planning consent should not be an issue if it's your own land and you will be processing wood from your own site/s. If you will be bringing wood in from elsewhere then it's more of an industrial activity and you could run into problems; however if you're employing people -- especially in a place struggling for jobs, like Devon, you might find them amenable.

 

Also bear in mind such things as whether what you erect will be visible from the road and by neighbours. If you have near-neighbours you need to ensure there's no nuisance or you will run into planning refusals.

 

Also go and see your local parish council and tell them what you want to do. You'll find that provided there's no nuisance they should be supportive and you should ask them to back your application when the planners request their comments. I'm a parish councillor so I know the positive effect of someone asking for genuine help and approval.

 

As far as the National Park factor (and IMHO it's a good idea anyway) go for a timber construction; ideally with a roof that blends in. I find that for a wood shed you can just put down a geo-textile (google 'Terram') on the ground and then spread a foot thickness of '4" down' to create a level, self-draining floor. No need for concrete as it'll all become covered in sawdust anyway. Overall, go for the sustainability factor. Anything that helps it all blend in will go down well. You could also mention that you're putting in a hole high up in the eaves and putting in a barn owl box.

 

PM me and I'll help with any specifics. I have a few local contacts. Which part of Devon are you?

 

Best wishes,

 

John Russell

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We live in a NP, wanted to build a pole barn, council told me NP have to give you planning permission. They have forms on internet and help, but I've not got round to it so dont know how easy it would be! let us know...

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You need to get your head around permitted development.

 

This should allow you to build what you want with out having to get full blown planning permission.

 

There is some information here:

 

Woodland Planning Legislation

 

Wodland Planning System

 

I don't think being in a national park changes your permitted development rights so you should be ok.

 

They key point is the buildings have to be necessary for 'forestry' and not for other uses.

 

Also if it was me I would be thinking of using the larch for building the barn and larch shingles for the roof.

 

Hope this helps.

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A barn/building used for Agricultural/Forestry use and more than 30m from a public right of way and this includes roads is classed as permitted development and does not need planning permission. One does have to inform the local council before starting incase it wishes to comment on materials considered as suitable to blend in to the rural area. I have done two on different sites and a third which had to have planning as close to a main road but application was simple.

 

Think of future needs and make some drawings/costings before contact with the council.

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A barn/building used for Agricultural/Forestry use and more than 30m from a public right of way and this includes roads is classed as permitted development and does not need planning permission. One does have to inform the local council before starting incase it wishes to comment on materials considered as suitable to blend in to the rural area. I have done two on different sites and a third which had to have planning as close to a main road but application was simple.

 

Think of future needs and make some drawings/costings before contact with the council.

 

We have a Public footpath near proposed site, does that mean it is near a public right of way?

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Its is only a public right of way if it is on the definitive ROW schedule & map. The local authority holds the up to date information. It could still be a 'public footpath' even if not a public right of way if access as been granted along the route via deeds or other legal means.

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You need to get your head around permitted development.

 

Also if it was me I would be thinking of using the larch for building the barn and larch shingles for the roof.

 

 

Thank you for that.

Do you have any advice on making Larch Shingles? It doesn't cleave well. Would one have to mill out the wood into slabs? Should these be chamfered? & what sort of sub-frame would one need? Some shingling would be lush - but I am hoping to make several barns and am concerned that proper shingling could be very resource and labour intesive.

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