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Marcus B-T

National Meripilus Network

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On the subject of Meripilus.

One 60ft Acer. Basal stem cavity 2/3 of stem with no rib formation.

Cavity extends down about three foot and up two feet from basal flare.

Fungi on one side of tree.

Crown lost leves in July.

Possible fell but prefere to climb as want to avoid damage to Ash trees!

 

Can drop 2/3 of crown but some lowering is unavoidable.

 

Would you climb it? Anyone?

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On the subject of Meripilus.

One 60ft Acer. Basal stem cavity 2/3 of stem with no rib formation.

Cavity extends down about three foot and up two feet from basal flare.

Fungi on one side of tree.

Crown lost leves in July.

Possible fell but prefere to climb as want to avoid damage to Ash trees!

 

Can drop 2/3 of crown but some lowering is unavoidable.

 

Would you climb it? Anyone?

 

Yes.....

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If its that tight in amongst ash canopy, why cant you rig off set-up using ash....the climb wouldnt bother me but riggin' forces are considerable and this will eliminate them entirely.....?

 

 

Sorry, this thread is taking leftfield turn....!

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Cheers, We will climb anyway because the thought of putting a felling cut into the void is more scary and the Ash is close enough to be clattered but too far to rig from:thumbdown:

 

Sorry to divert thread!

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Cheers, We will climb anyway because the thought of putting a felling cut into the void is more scary and the Ash is close enough to be clattered but too far to rig from:thumbdown:

 

Sorry to divert thread!

 

If its very wobbly when you get up there, take some of one side then go over to the other side and take of a similar amount moving round the tree trying to maintain a reasonably balanced crown.

With the rigging keep the pieces small a try not to shock load.

 

Works for me!

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If its very wobbly when you get up there, take some of one side then go over to the other side and take of a similar amount moving round the tree trying to maintain a reasonably balanced crown.

With the rigging keep the pieces small a try not to shock load.

 

Works for me!

 

Yep! Cheers. The tree is leaning also. A braver person than me would lower the back limbs off in big stem smashing lumps first but I know someone who would:ohmy:

No one on here I may add!!!

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I am of the pursuasion that there is a small but growing trend afoot, to hold off from immediately felling Beech with Meripilus.

 

 

The key in my opinion as you quite rightly suggest Andrew, is monitoring and investigation.

Appreciate your data posting.

 

:ciao:

 

That is certainly the case and I think we need a far more considered approach to such things, because we are all too quick to jump to conclusions on the first sign of a fruiting body. To be frank, as professionals educated in tree care we really should know better…….

 

As I suggested in my postings on the Grifola thread (http://arbtalk.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?p=71269#post71269) it is all to easy to just investigate one aspect of what are frequently very complex tree issues, with many processes a natural part of the arboreal ecology that we should not be considering to be a problem at all.

 

Meripilus is a classic example of this because it has attracted a very bad name for itself and I believe has been falsely blamed for root plate failures. In a very similar way to Grifola, Meripilus is associated with the decomposition of the dysfunctional root system of mature trees. Although unlike Grifola it does not appear to have the capacity to produce fruiting bodies from deep decay, well below the soil surface. As such the decay is likely to be very close to where the fruiting bodies are observed, which is a useful characteristic to observe.

 

The file I have attached this time provides an example of a mature beech tree which was observed with Meripilus fruiting bodies around its buttresses for a number of years. However, the tree pictured in the photographs has not been seen with any brackets around its base for over ten years. The thermal image picked up a column of seasoned (dysfunctional) wood up the centre of the trunk, which is characteristic of trees that have been subject to some form of basal decay. However, the buttresses can be seen to be healthy and the tree is surviving very well, with no apparent detrimental affects from the history of Meripilus.

 

It is also worth considering at this point that the vigorous growth of the fibrous root system around the basis of this tree may be in part due to the fact that the decay of the old root system has released nutrients into the soil that are now enhancing the trees growth. This is nature demonstrating how true recycling works……

Thermal of Beech with history of M.giganteus c.pdf

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