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slack ma girdle

Blown trees, discuss.

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Whilst cutting up this blown tree i was thinking about safely getting the tree on the gound.

How do you do it ?

Safety consideration ?

Tricks, knacks etc.

 

There are a couple of other pictures that i have taken which i will post as this discussion (hopefully) proceeds.

59765e2e6c887_GarronAsh.jpg.ac5b503fd6dfab9850e4f0a56e6d1641.jpg

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Treegeek   

Difficult to say with out seeing more officialy its step cut off the root plate and winch it out until its on the deck and then treat like any other fell but for the real world method get in there releive the tension and sned out any way needed slash and death cuts.

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At this point, the tree is completely detatched from its root plate as it got blown off in the gales last year. The tree is just resting on its branches. I was wondering how people go about getting the high up branches (in this case 15' up) down without killing themselves

Edited by slack ma girdle
Half witted abilities

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There is, I think, an NPTC module for windblown trees. I was lucky enough to learn on the real deal back in '87.

Slash and death cuts doesn't even come close.

The forces involved are enormous and however you do it you need to take a good look at how the tree fell and where the pressures are.

Look at how stable the tree is when you start the dismantle stay very alert to movement at all times.

If you start to sned out with the root plate still on watch out for it standing upright quite quickly.

With the root plate cut off the tree is more prone to roll. On, it may stand up. Once you have cut off the root plate don't let anyone walk under or behind it as they can sit back down suddenly.

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Rob D   

First off I always do all the easy stuff first. The branches which are low and with no pressure on them.

 

Once they're gone you can see more quickly where the tree is resting.

 

You can then try some top gob cuts, then undercut which should allow gentle release of pressure.

 

When you're left with the main butt on 3/4 branches and there's lots of high stuff I'd make sure the tree is stable and climb along it, attach in with harness and fell out the stuff pointing upward/on top of the butt.

 

Then look at winching the main butt (rotate it) so is resting on the ground.

 

Good fun!

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kav   

Probally not the offical method but it doesnt look to big. Break down with power pruner/poolesaw and winch out butt?

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Tom D   

Sever the rootplate using appropriate cuts, J cut probably. Then process as if you had just felled it. easy really.

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Treegeek   

I cover emergency call out for highways have down 8 calls since lunch time yesterday you do get an eye for this sort of stuff and a knowledge of what you can do ie like walk up the back of big old hardwoods to fell out any vertical limbs.

Personaly I would start by removing any limbs not under load with on eye to possibly saving a limb in case it did roll and the slowly start to remove load limbs I always talk my plan though with my team and it usually changes as you strt to see how she is reacting remember your escape routes have a second pair of eyes watching at times have a def up listening for sudden sounds etc

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