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David Humphries

Managing Trees with Decay & Dysfunction

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[quote=Monkey-D;505241

 

]Not quite as cavernous as you would expect Gerrit.

 

Although any kind of soft "filling" does play clever tricks with tube mechanics this is still in effect, mechanically speaking a hollow tube, and would be subject to normal T/R ratio guidelines, and very prone to shear along the limb length and compression sinks/hosepipe kinking:001_smile:

 

just for those that are "into that kinda thing"

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Line of Maturing Oaks

 

Lots of Mycorrhizal associations across the root zone, Russula, Lactarius, Amanita sp......

 

But on the flip side, these are also colonised by the brown roting Fistulina & also the Red data listed Podoscypha multizonata.

 

I'm fairly comfortable with what the Beefsteak is upto with these trees, what I don't really know is what the Podoscypha is upto.

 

My limited understanding of this fungus, (apart from urban rareity) is that it is suposedly parasitic on roots but also possibly becoming a necrophytic saprotroph.

 

Watching this line closely for any noticable change or major shifting of trunk orientation.

 

 

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Line of Maturing Oaks .. these are also colonised by ... the Red data listed Podoscypha multizonata. what I don't really know is what the Podoscypha is upto. My limited understanding of this fungus, (apart from urban rareity) is that it is suposedly parasitic on roots but also possibly becoming a necrophytic saprotroph.

 

Which according to Jülich : "auf Erde, vermutlich aus Wurzeln oder vergrabenen Holz wachsend" (growing on the ground, probably fruiting from roots or buried wood), and Ellis & Ellis : "growing on the ground in deciduous woods, probably as a rule from buried roots or wood" should be correct.

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Which according to Jülich : "auf Erde, vermutlich aus Wurzeln oder vergrabenen Holz wachsend" (growing on the ground, probably fruiting from roots or buried wood), and Ellis & Ellis : "growing on the ground in deciduous woods, probably as a rule from buried roots or wood" should be correct.

 

 

Thankyou Gerrit

 

It seems a little un-scientific with the use of "probably" doesn't it ?

 

Is this a 'literal' translation Gerrit ?

 

 

I think Tony once said he'd come across a fruiting from on top of a stump.

 

 

 

 

Lovely shadowlithing there david!:biggrin:

 

Sent from Rob's GalaxySII

 

It's like a compultion when the sun doth shine upon ones back :biggrin:

 

 

 

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It seems a little un-scientific with the use of "probably" doesn't it ? Is this a 'literal' translation? I think Tony once said he'd come across a fruiting from on top of a stump.

 

David,

Yes, it is : vermutlich = supposed, presumed or probable.

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Beech which has had a Merripilus association for at least 3/4 years.

 

First shots are from the fruits of the last couple of years

The complete tree & under canopy shots, were from today.

 

 

 

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It sits at the edge of a fairly well used woodland path, and has me concerned enough to 'delve a little deeper' to enlighten my management of this tree.

 

There are two pronounced flat areas where there should be sloping butresses on opposite sides of the tree. These are the specific areas where fruiting has been noted in the past and also where associated roots leading away from the tree have also shown fruiting.

 

On one of these areas there appears to be a constriction at some point where perhaps a younger surface level root had started to girdle the trunk. This has now 'gone' or grown away from the trunk.

 

 

We took out the Airspade to investigate these areas & to give us the opportunity to see/hear what is going on............underground.

 

I'm not going to go all scientific here with percentages & dimensions etc, but we did find older roots that (although structurally hard) are to some degree hollow, & have obviously been decayed from underneath, and also (a few) much younger roots that had been completely desicated by the white rotter.

 

There was on the plus side, a notable expansion of younger/sound & functional roots coming from the flat areas of the root crown.

 

 

I will tag this tree to be monitored more regularly than the rest of it's neighbours in what is not a high priority target zone.

 

 

Airspade & excavation shots........

 

 

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we did find older roots that (although structurally hard) are to some degree hollow, & have obviously been decayed from underneath, and also (a few) much younger roots that had been completely desicated by the white rotter. There was on the plus side, a notable expansion of younger/sound & functional roots coming from the flat areas of the root crown.

 

David,

Great documentation :thumbup1: .

The decay of older (major) roots from underneath and from then on inside the roots and the reactive formation of adventitious roots around the base of the trunk by the beech is exactly what is documented from the tree species specific attacking strategy of M. giganteus in beech and the compensation for the loss of roots by the tree.

Where you also able to assess the extent of white rot from the possibly meanwhile "dived under" mycelium at and underneath ground level of the central wood column of the trunk's base ?

Edited by Fungus

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Where you also able to assess the extent of white rot from the possibly meanwhile "dived under" mycelium at and underneath ground level of the central wood column of the trunk's base ?

 

 

Not at that stage Gerrit, this was just a preliminary excavation.

 

 

 

 

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