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Fungus ID

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Hi,

 

Could anyone help me identify this fungus fruiting body? Found at the base of a common beech. Brackets are black/greyish on top & Browny/White/Orange underneath.

 

Cheers

IMG_0076.jpg.3b4d85c71722876b12cb25e0c7a63cef.jpg

IMG_0075.jpg.b518c5d6b6a272d0f33ccbcad533afc8.jpg

IMG_0074.jpg.8a4d17a60d4c4f3220a78e87f2466e29.jpg

IMG_0073.jpg.046858b7b3c6e2cfa37f1077fbcd4037.jpg

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The very black one may be a Ganoderma pfiefferi, even if on the same stump

 

ganoderma australe 95% ganoderma applanatum5% likely

 

microscope needed for certain identification and an issue that is very important to distinguish them as G. australe has much more serious implications.

 

it looks odd as it has repeatedly been broken off and has had to regrow.

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The very black one may be a Ganoderma pfiefferi, even if on the same stump ... ganoderma australe 95% ganoderma applanatum 5% likely

 

Tony,

Because of the distinct yellowish layer appearing as first layer ("fire test" with match, sparkling just like an orange peel) after the upper surface is scratched or damaged, I consider all the brackets to be of G. pfeifferi.

-

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Tony,

Because of the distinct yellowish layer appearing as first layer ("fire test" with match, sparkling just like an orange peel) after the upper surface is scratched or damaged, I consider all the brackets to be of G. pfeifferi.

-

 

yes I think pfiefferi is most likely for the top shot, and a definate possible for the other shots but for one critical issue that may or may not be relevant.

 

Pfiefferi when very old is crumbly as it is eaten by some form of insect here in england at least leaving only a thin shell and therefore the lower ones for me must be considered tougher as they appear to have been resilient to breaking on repeated occasions.

 

i have seen pfiefferi in a blackened hardened state only when exposed to lots of sunlight and dessication like the first image.

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also guys, is Ganoderma pfeifferi a threat to the tree or is it benign, its obviously been growing there for some time, can it be left or does the tree need to be removed. Its located by the side of a cricket pitch, so could be a hazard.

 

Thanks

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is Ganoderma pfeifferi a threat to the tree or is it benign, its obviously been growing there for some time, can it be left or does the tree need to be removed. Its located by the side of a cricket pitch, so could be a hazard.

 

A threat, yes, benine no, because it is a (biotrophic) parasite slowly killing the tree while decomposing the (dead) wood of the base of the trunk and/or the root plate.

The risk can not be determined without further in situ assessment of the amount of wood affected by the mycelium of G. pfeifferi and/or the other Ganoderma, which both cause a white rot with selective delignification.

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