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Mesterh

Factory eye splices.

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Mesterh   

Was just wondering how they do their splicing?

 

Ie something like yale XTC they seem to keep the core intact inside the eye.

 

How do they do it?

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Liam88   
With a machine??

 

Yale defiantly do it with a machine. On page 5 of their catalogue it describes the machine as the widow maker. I can and I'm sure many other splicers out there can think of another name for it ....

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Nigel   

There is a myth that Yale use a machine to manufacture the splice, rope goes in one end out pops a splice. The Yale splice is actually manufactured by hand, the only part the machine undertakes is to consistantly bury the splice which enables them to maintain the inner core. Unfortunatly this machine is kept secret so no pictures, but best described as a large hydraulic ram which pulls the rope through. Once thisprocess is completed the splice returns to the bench to be finsihed again by hand. So a splice manufactured in the morning is the same as one manufactured in the afternoon as the splicer is not fatigued by burying the splice by hand. This also enables Yale to apply the CE standard to their eyes.

Edited by Nigel

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Mesterh   
There is a myth that Yale use a machine to manufacture the splice, rope goes in one end out pops a splice. The Yale splice is actually manufactured by hand, the only part the machine undertakes is to consistantly bury the splice which enables them to maintain the inner core. Unfortunatly this machine is kept secret so no pictures, but best described as a large hydraulic ram which pulls the rope through. Once thisprocess is completed the splice returns to the bench to be finsihed again by hand. So a splice manufactured in the morning is the same as one manufactured in the afternoon as the splicer is not fatigued by burying the splice by hand. This also enables Yale to apply the CE standard to their eyes.

 

 

Cheers for the info.:thumbup1:

 

Do you know how a factory splice stands up to a standard(all by hand) splice?

 

I imagine its stronger due to still having the core but is it much?

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Nigel   
Cheers for the info.:thumbup1:

 

Do you know how a factory splice stands up to a standard(all by hand) splice?

 

 

to many variants involved to answer this 100%, who did the splice, to whos instructions, to whos specification, etc. sorry. the only thing that is consitant is each factory splice is constructed to the same standard.

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Cheers for the info.:thumbup1:

 

Do you know how a factory splice stands up to a standard(all by hand) splice?

 

I imagine its stronger due to still having the core but is it much?

 

Sixteen strand ropes strength is in the outer cover not the core.

 

There is a myth that hand splicing is somehow inferior to a factory splicing and that a hand spliced rope that is made in the morning, first thing, is somehow different to a rope that is hand spliced, last thing, in the afternoon despite the fact that the same, FACTORY, splicing instructions are followed and carried out to the letter.:001_tt2:

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Peter   

There have been plenty of tests done on hand spliced ropes btw, and in my opinion since the same process is carried out each time there is really no reason to suppose that a properly constructed hand splice will be any less consistant than a properly constructed machine buried hand splice.

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