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David Humphries

To Mulch, or not to Mulch?

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Looks good with the blossom and I think saving old trees is a worthy activity but... sorry theres a but. Was there discussion about just felling and replanting. It would have been cheaper though not as interesting visually. In time though is this approach better value. I'm sure you've gone through this discussion and I would value your views.

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Whats this 'cheaper' you talk of ? :confused1::biggrin:

 

 

This is an historic tree to this location and worth absolutely ever penny and minute of my time to manage it.

 

Its the last of its age from an original victorian orchard planting.

 

Its aesthetic and biodiversity value is more than significant.

 

Not many of these to the pound these days, particularly within the conurbations of an ever concreted city enlargement.

 

 

.

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Whats this 'cheaper' you talk of ? :confused1::biggrin:

 

This is an historic tree to this location and worth absolutely ever penny and minute of my time to manage it.

 

Its the last of its age from an original victorian orchard planting.

 

Its aesthetic and biodiversity value is more than significant.

 

Not many of these to the pound these days, particularly within the conurbations of an ever concreted city enlargement..

 

Hahaha! I can almost see the gradually increasing forward body posture, accompanied by a slight threatening growl with each consecutive sentence.

 

Nice job as always, David. Have there been any measurable or noteworthy changes within the tree or soil since the start of this project?

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Hahaha! I can almost see the gradually increasing forward body posture, accompanied by a slight threatening growl with each consecutive sentence.

 

Nice job as always, David. Have there been any measurable or noteworthy changes within the tree or soil since the start of this project?

 

Was it really that obvious :blushing::biggrin:

 

 

A (noticeable) increase in epicormic activity throughout the canopy and on the trunk and both saprophytic and mycorrhizal fungi within the mulch bed.

 

Would be interesting to carry out a fruit survey year on year.

I haven't carried out any specific soil tests.

 

How's things with you and Sylvia in the 'Mountainous' state, Dave?

Apart from enjoying your climbing what else ya upto work wise?

 

 

Be sure to check in again next year :thumbup:

 

 

 

.

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...How's things with you and Sylvia in the 'Mountainous' state, Dave?

Apart from enjoying your climbing what else ya upto work wise?...

 

Thanks for the info, David. Life is good here in the " mountains " though we are learning that trees are not the only organisms where older often also means shorter. :lol:

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Whats this 'cheaper' you talk of ? :confused1::biggrin:

 

 

This is an historic tree to this location and worth absolutely ever penny and minute of my time to manage it.

 

Its the last of its age from an original victorian orchard planting.

 

Its aesthetic and biodiversity value is more than significant.

 

Not many of these to the pound these days, particularly within the conurbations of an ever concreted city enlargement.

 

 

.

 

A very valid

and needed point these days. The tree looks like its liking the special treatment! I'm doing my 2:nd stage mulching on the oak as of now... Will post pics later on when its finished. The compaction is severe and I could really do with an Airspade but due to funding... mulching will have to do for now. Any more pics as the tree are in full leaf by now?!?

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The compaction is severe and I could really do with an Airspade but due to funding...

 

Cheap means of aerating and inoculating soil include swinging a pick or iron pry bar into the soil and bending it in 4 directions, followed by a blasting with the garden hose.

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The compaction is severe and I could really do with an Airspade but due to funding...

 

Cheap means of aerating and inoculating soil include swinging a pick or iron pry bar into the soil and bending it in 4 directions, followed by a blasting with the garden hose.

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