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Phytophthora lateralis found at Loch Lomond

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"are you quoting from Sinclairs 'Diseases of Trees and Shrubs'? I'm still waiting for it to arrive."

 

Yes, you will find it quite useful; #1 tool for diagnostics imo.

 

"You've alluded to heating dead tissues in other posts and I've seen one or two youtube videos where you advocate it. I don't believe that I've read this anywhere else, in the mainstream literature."

 

It's a common practice in the orchards and in horticulture. The only momentum that counts is callus growth. :001_tt2: Our arb lit is relatively narrow, so our mainstream is a rivulet in the big picture.

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"are you quoting from Sinclairs 'Diseases of Trees and Shrubs'? I'm still waiting for it to arrive."

 

Yes, you will find it quite useful; #1 tool for diagnostics imo.

 

"You've alluded to heating dead tissues in other posts and I've seen one or two youtube videos where you advocate it. I don't believe that I've read this anywhere else, in the mainstream literature."

 

It's a common practice in the orchards and in horticulture. The only momentum that counts is callus growth. :001_tt2: Our arb lit is relatively narrow, so our mainstream is a rivulet in the big picture.

 

As usual, I'm searching in the wrong place. Thanks for the info, I'll delve a little deeper:thumbup1:

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The text that you await is as mainstream and as dependable as they come, and the recommendation to use heat is right out there; no need to read between the lines. In contrast, see page 8 here TCI Magazine September 2013

 

Dr. Hudler is on the same campus as Sinclair, yet diddles on with DNA analysis while ignoring the Diseases text. Arborists get next to no guidance re treatment, unless they comb the texts. So much for outreach from the ivory tower...Piling it high and Deep, and in all the wrong places. :001_rolleyes:

 

Also, I understand that Percival fellow in your merry land is trialing heat usage on Pseudomonas cankers in Aesculus. :001_smile:

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:thumbup::thumbup:Thanks Guy, I must try harder to keep up.

 

Me too! Lots to keep up with. Too often we wait for some kind of 'Word' of approval to try new practices, whilst the trees scream in pain. :blushing:

 

Maybe different in UK< but...If it ain't wrong, why worry about who considers it right?

 

You'll enjoy Sinclair; very lucid writing. :001_cool:

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References from Sinclair; going waaay beyond FC if you have time to e-dig...attached is all the 332 pages of references from the whole book, arranged by topic.

 

Root rots and feeder root necroses: Root and crown rot of Port Orford cedar

Hansen, E. M., Goheen, D. J., Jules, E. S., and Ullian, B. 2000. Managing Port-Orford-cedar and the introduced pathogen Phytophthora lateralis. Plant Dis. 84:4–14.

Hansen, E. M., and Hamm, P. B. 1996. Survival of Phytophthora lateralis in infected roots of Port Orford cedar. Plant Dis. 80:1075–1078.

Hansen, E. M., and Sutton, W., eds. 2000. Phytophthora diseases of forest trees. Ore. State Univ., Corvallis. 152 pp.

Murray, M. S., and Hansen, E. M. 1997. Susceptibility of Pacific yew to Phytophthora lateralis. Plant Dis. 81:1400–1404.

Ostrofsky, W. D., Pratt, R. G., and Roth, L. F. 1977. Detection of Phytophthora lateralis in soil organic matter and factors that affect its survival. Phytopathology 67:79–84.

Roth, L. F., Harvey, R. D. Jr., and Kliejunas, J. T. 1987. Port-Orford-cedar root disease. USDA For. Serv. Pac. Northwest Reg. R6 FPM PR 010 91. Internet pub.

Trione, E. J. 1959. The pathology of Phytophthora lateralis on native Chamaecyparis lawsoniana. Phytopathology 49:306–310.

Tucker, C. M., and Milbrath, J. A. 1942. Root rot of Chamaecyparis caused by a species of Phytophthora. Mycologia 34:94–103.

Winton, L. M., and Hansen, E. M. 2001. Molecular diagnosis of Phytophthora lateralis in trees, water, and foliage baits using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. For. Pathol. 31:275–283.

Disease References Sinclair 2005.doc

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