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David Humphries

Decay images

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2 hours ago, AJStrees said:

very interesting Mr Humphries. What group of fungi does this come under? Wondering where I might find it in the Michael Jordan encyclopedia.

 

BTW I PMed you some time ago. Don't know if you ever got my message. 

Fomitoporia but used to be known as Phellinus. Similar to Phellinus pomaceus. Pretty sure it’s not in Jordan’s. Not many of the fungi Id books list it as it’s seldom noted. Think Ryvarden has it listed in his Europe’s Polypore volumes.

 

Don’t think I saw your message, was it here on AT or on my work email? Can you send it again.

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Coincidentally just had to fell a mature Sycamore that had a very small amount of Kretzs at the base. Decent enough canopy but target prompted the removal just to be on the safe side. Pics show how deceiving such a small amount of the FFB of this one can be. The pseudoscaratial plate pics are as impressive as David's but clearly visible all the same:

 

 

IMG_4641.JPG

IMG_4642.JPG

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On 16/01/2019 at 20:03, David Humphries said:

Fomitoporia but used to be known as Phellinus. Similar to Phellinus pomaceus. Pretty sure it’s not in Jordan’s. Not many of the fungi Id books list it as it’s seldom noted. Think Ryvarden has it listed in his Europe’s Polypore volumes.

 

Don’t think I saw your message, was it here on AT or on my work email? Can you send it again.

Okay will check out that fungi in further detail. 

 

 

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On 17/01/2019 at 09:38, Nick Harrison said:

Coincidentally just had to fell a mature Sycamore that had a very small amount of Kretzs at the base. Decent enough canopy but target prompted the removal just to be on the safe side. Pics show how deceiving such a small amount of the FFB of this one can be. The pseudoscaratial plate pics are as impressive as David's but clearly visible all the same:

 

 

IMG_4641.JPG

IMG_4642.JPG

Interesting. did you have any structural testing done on the tree before felling? Picus or anything to see how developed it was?

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On 17/01/2019 at 09:38, Nick Harrison said:

Coincidentally just had to fell a mature Sycamore that had a very small amount of Kretzs at the base. Decent enough canopy but target prompted the removal just to be on the safe side. Pics show how deceiving such a small amount of the FFB of this one can be. The pseudoscaratial plate pics are as impressive as David's but clearly visible all the same:

 

 

IMG_4641.JPG

IMG_4642.JPG

Hi Nick, how’s tricks?

Any shots of the context of the tree? 

Also interested to know if you had any decay assessment undertaken?

Fine set of images. Strong band of reaction at the edge of the decay evident. 

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On ‎18‎/‎01‎/‎2019 at 09:51, AJStrees said:

Interesting. did you have any structural testing done on the tree before felling? Picus or anything to see how developed it was?

no option with structural testing, I work at a local authority.... I had to make an informed guess, given the target of a cemetery and commercial premises I erred on the side of caution. there's obviously plenty of sound wood but my opinion is that the decay would only have increased and without access to costly decay detection equipment or a crystal ball I had to unfortunately go for the fell. I personally feel it was the right decision given the above factors but I'm confident there'll be an opposing opinion lurking about the forum :BoomSmilie_anim:

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On ‎18‎/‎01‎/‎2019 at 15:27, David Humphries said:

Hi Nick, how’s tricks?

Any shots of the context of the tree? 

Also interested to know if you had any decay assessment undertaken?

Fine set of images. Strong band of reaction at the edge of the decay evident. 

Hi David

 

sorry for the typo, meant to say the pics 'aren't' as good as yours!

 

I unfortunately didn't get pics of local context but as explained in previous reply this tree was in a fairly prominent location. The cemetery in question is a fairly busy one and the tree was located at a well used section of the site. Also has a small outbuilding right next to it (toilets) although probably not as well frequented as those in your neck of the woods :P

 

my most technical instrument of detection is my hammer which I used and as expected could not find anything to raise concern. Most thing to note was the very small FFB, nearly missed it, unfortunately didn't get a pic of it though...I clearly wasn't paying enough attention whilst at Golders

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2 hours ago, Nick Harrison said:

no option with structural testing, I work at a local authority.... I had to make an informed guess, given the target of a cemetery and commercial premises I erred on the side of caution. there's obviously plenty of sound wood but my opinion is that the decay would only have increased and without access to costly decay detection equipment or a crystal ball I had to unfortunately go for the fell. I personally feel it was the right decision given the above factors but I'm confident there'll be an opposing opinion lurking about the forum :BoomSmilie_anim:

I see what you mean. I was only asking really to know how much testing goes on out there. I have fairly recently started managing the trees on an Estate and it is taking quite some arm twisting to get funds for this, though it is a private estate. I would think local authority ought to want to get into saving trees, etc.. but of course there is indeed work to do on that and obviously money involved which means difficulty. LOL!

 

But don't want to be the "opposing opinion" lurking about the forum. 😎

 

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I've posted this Red Oak before (evidence of both Ganoderma resinaceum & Ganoderma australe) but on passing today it was worth noting the decay process over the two years since it was felled. It appears that the reaction boundaries between the two decay zones of the G. resinaceum and G. australe colonies still remain quite lignified.

 

9A2A5F94-742D-466D-A6E0-FA37DA38B15C.thumb.jpeg.66361dd305086add5d13ee7cd59d61c7.jpeg

 

A02801D9-18B7-40C8-BC82-D8CCDAE32AE2.thumb.jpeg.a3fc21581bc31dd4cb8f5fe126111883.jpeg

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On 04/04/2019 at 18:32, David Humphries said:

I've posted this Red Oak before (evidence of both Ganoderma resinaceum & Ganoderma australe) but on passing today it was worth noting the decay process over the two years since it was felled. It appears that the reaction boundaries between the two decay zones of the G. resinaceum and G. australe colonies still remain quite lignified.

 

9A2A5F94-742D-466D-A6E0-FA37DA38B15C.thumb.jpeg.66361dd305086add5d13ee7cd59d61c7.jpeg

 

A02801D9-18B7-40C8-BC82-D8CCDAE32AE2.thumb.jpeg.a3fc21581bc31dd4cb8f5fe126111883.jpeg

Hi David, Interesting to see.

 

At the time before felling was there any specific testing done on that tree?

 

Just wondered if you were able to know what degree of decay was already underway or was it just too risky due to the obvious fungal brackets on the outside?

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