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Rate My Hinge.

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On 07/06/2018 at 13:12, Jon@CareFell said:

Old School.

7574BF42-83BE-4628-BA89-F8D6038B9CCC.jpeg

'That's a corker . Wish I could do 'em like that .

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1 hour ago, billpierce said:

Just for TCD if your still out there. 20180726_121034.jpeg20180726_121026.jpeg

If you fell of that you would break your neck ! ūüėĀ

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Noticed this perched on one of the trailers, must have been the hinge from hell. About four chains died  :)

 

06EFAABB-04F3-4EC3-A1A8-898F03C1E4D8_zps

 

81036828-00F9-4804-BD6E-AFB9DE3BE153_zps

 

 

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we've been getting into it over at the buzz and thought I'd post some pics here for your perusal.. Hope everyone s doing well..

 

I do believe in the tapered hinge's ability to help control against side lean, and use it religiously, though I understand it is not taught by pro trainers, one of whom has gone as far as to call it B.S.

 

I also like fat hinges, high pull lines tied off to trucks or skid steer loaders, and don't use wedges much, though will often gut the hinge to reduce drag from the hinge fibers...

 

Here are some pics, with more unconventional cuts coming soon

fat hinge.jpg

fat ash big whickers.jpg

tapered hinge fat locust.jpg

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And here are a couple of controversial pics.. I took these pics because the hinges worked. In the case of the ash, much better than I expected it to...  I never really thought much about it, or considered them extraordinary. They just seemed to be a logical extension of the tapered hinge...  putting as much of the hinge on the far side of the lean as possible... Only to find out later that this type of hinge was named the swing dutchman by Doug Dent and illustrated in his book, "Professional Timber Falling" on pages 110-111

tapered hinge ash.jpg

tapered hinge small locst.jpg

dent's swing dutchman.jpg

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some viewers have mistakenly thought there was a bypass in the face of the locust pictured above.. I NEVER bypass my face cuts... Usually, just the opposite, taking an extra 20 seconds to make a "plate cut", a name I gave to the practice of taking a third cut from the face and lifting out a flat piece (usually around 1/2") from the floor of the face, which gives a little height to the fibers at the front of the hinge.

plate cut w penny.jpg

dry tulip top plunge.jpg

plate cut face.jpg

Edited by dadio
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58 minutes ago, dadio said:

though I understand it is not taught by pro trainers, one of whom has gone as far as to call it B.S.

Find it hard to believe how anyone can't understand how/why a tapered hinge works, its pretty straight forward stuff.  Like you I used to use it all the time.

 

Is your original article still kicking around?  I'd love to get it posted in the article section here.  I may have asked you that before?

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