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rupert

Inonotus dryadeus help

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What action would you take considering this healthy oaks location? I'm thinking of proposing a root investigation to establish the extent of the decay. Would you also suggest a picus scan? Thanks :001_smile:

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Root collar inspection. I certainly wouldn't fell without on the basis of that photo. Even if there is significant decay there looks to be scope for a decent reduction.

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No...Innonotus dryadeus is not known for it's alacrity. You should have more faith in the impressive systemic and genetic strengths of Quercus robur (imo)

In have fallen foul of folk in a similar thread regarding this fungus...I would stand by my comments though.

A tentative root investigation only makes sense if you are aware of what exactly you are looking for...in this regard, can I suggest referring to "Fungal Strategies of Wood Decay in Trees" (Engels, mattheck, Scwarze)....

Im not convinced of the value of picus below ground ( and at flare it needs caliper...)

What target occupation/value have you assessed this as being?

I agree, we cant save every tree but your comments are premature....!

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Sadly thats what I thought. But as it has a TPO wont I have to provide evidence that the decay is advanced enough to cause root failure?

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The target area is high with many vehicles passing and parking beneath it on a daily occurrence

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Root collar inspection. I certainly wouldn't fell without on the basis of that photo. Even if there is significant decay there looks to be scope for a decent reduction.

 

 

:thumbup1:

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If this was my shout, i would propose the start of a retrenchment program, starting at 20% after an intial root investigation made this viable. i would aim over the next 20 years to have it down to a pollard type scenario, wherby its carbs will all be close to the point it needs them most in this late stage of its life and also a more dense canopy of finer growth. lower leverages, denser foliage for production of resources and it will most likely go on and on and on. Ive even seen one, at bradgate that has completley done away with dryadeus and now has a stilt like form with a coned cavity formation, there is only anicdotal evidence for the windthrow liability, and if the reductions manage to retrench it before and stress and die back starts to occur, im sure it has a long long and viable life, with care.

 

but its probably going to get the chop!

 

I did a lovely thirty percent reduction on a dryadeus infected oak last winter, havent been back to visit yet but now im thinking of it shall pop back and do some after photos.

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