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Steve Bullman

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59 minutes ago, Dan Maynard said:

Nah, get it cut and split by spring will be fine next year.

Dan's right, get it cut and split then stack it in a covered airy place and it will be dry enough in a season

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Cheers again ... I will do, I was mainly asking as there's a load more  of it I can get and if it wasn't a good burner (although from what I've read it's not the hottest) I wouldn't bother but if it is I'll go nab some more.

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10 minutes ago, Witterings said:

Cheers again ... I will do, I was mainly asking as there's a load more  of it I can get and if it wasn't a good burner (although from what I've read it's not the hottest) I wouldn't bother but if it is I'll go nab some more.

It#s not ideal as it has a high moisture content and when dry is very light, so it burns away quickly.

 

The reason to cut and split it is so air can blow through it to dry it.

 

It's a funny business deciding what's best for your fire but as everyone here will say if it is dry any wood burns okay.

 

I've a recent surprising  thing about wood stacked outside. I have underestimated the amount of wood I need now I have arranged for my little stove to heat the whole house and not use the gas central heating.

 

So I have already made a big dent in the 4 cubic metre glazed log store I built.

 

To supplement my dry wood I have scavenged a heap of western red cedar bars that was stacked in a wood four years ago. The WRC is acceptably dry and burns fast and hot but you do need a good few logs in the fire at all times, a dry bit of sycamore will burn by itself.

 

At the top of the stack was a piece of sweet chestnut 4ft long 8" diameter and with its bark intact. The thin sapwood band under the bark was pulpy and the logs felt heavy, so I weighed and dried one, it was 47% MC  which is wetter than if it was winter felled. That same piece of wood kept under cover would have dried in a summer.

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you may have fun splitting it.  There is a reason cricket bats are made of willow.... not all willow is the same but some has a property like rubber for absorbing shock.  I try very hard to spot and pass over willow these days.

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56 minutes ago, neiln said:

you may have fun splitting it.  There is a reason cricket bats are made of willow.... not all willow is the same but some has a property like rubber for absorbing shock.  I try very hard to spot and pass over willow these days.

 

I'll try and use something other than a cricket ball to try and split it then 😄

 

Maybe I#ll try some before i go and pick up any more!!

  • Haha 1

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