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Hedgelaying pics

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1 minute ago, gary112 said:

Looks tidy Simon,whereabouts did you do it and did you enjoy it?

Thanks, we were all pleased with ourselves anyway 👍🏻 

Did it down at Cirencester Ag college, the instructor was a fella called Andrew Williams. Really enjoyed it! 

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On 25/01/2020 at 08:21, SimpleSimon said:

Thanks, we were all pleased with ourselves anyway 👍🏻 

Did it down at Cirencester Ag college, the instructor was a fella called Andrew Williams. Really enjoyed it! 

Smart job! Is that all hand cut?

I have been asked to teach someone and whilst I know all the principles I am worried that I will miss something essential. Can anyone give me a top 5 list of essential rules?

TIA 

OG

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1 hour ago, organic guy said:

Smart job! Is that all hand cut?

I have been asked to teach someone and whilst I know all the principles I am worried that I will miss something essential. Can anyone give me a top 5 list of essential rules?

TIA 

OG

All hand cut, yes, with a billhook and axe. The teacher had a chainsaw "just in case" but we didn't come to need it. 

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This one was a pain. Restoration job. Roadside hazel hedge, massively overstood. Very congested stools, stems about 20 feet high and all tangled up in the overhead power lines. Roadside ones were bowing outwards a mile and arching right across the road. Some of the really bow-legged ones were a real pig to get down without twisting off, hence a few bracing crooks.

 

Looked like it was once a double comb hedge but the inner comb was all but gone, full of dead wood and elder so not layable. The whole lot was smothered with ivy. Cut out the remains of the inner comb, cleaned out, planted up the gaps with hazel whips and this is what was left.

 

DSC_0105.thumb.JPG.f5a0dfc3bbaa73c658f32f00d99d068b.JPG

 

Made for quite a heavy, knuckly hedge but it's a good barrier that gives the owner's garden much more privacy and it should regrow well. 

DSC_0106.thumb.JPG.0ea77331194a689707fdc43fa26275dd.JPG

 

DSC_0109.thumb.JPG.815a42bff45987620042fdbeeb716f70.JPG

 

DSC_0107.thumb.JPG.74d4bb1af98dcd8e3ff13ac55c87b516.JPG

Edited by Gimlet
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This one was a pain. Restoration job. Roadside hazel hedge, massively overstood. Very congested stools, stems about 20 feet high and all tangled up in the overhead power lines. Roadside ones were bowing outwards a mile and arching right across the road. Some of the really bow-legged ones were a real pig to get down without twisting off, hence a few bracing crooks.
 
Looked like it was once a double comb hedge but the inner comb was all but gone, full of dead wood and elder so not layable. The whole lot was smothered with ivy. Cut out the remains of the inner comb, cleaned out, planted up the gaps with hazel whips and this is what was left.
 
DSC_0105.thumb.JPG.f5a0dfc3bbaa73c658f32f00d99d068b.JPG
 
Made for quite a heavy, knuckly hedge but it's a good barrier that gives the owner's garden much more privacy and it should regrow well. 
DSC_0106.thumb.JPG.0ea77331194a689707fdc43fa26275dd.JPG
 
DSC_0109.thumb.JPG.815a42bff45987620042fdbeeb716f70.JPG
 
DSC_0107.thumb.JPG.74d4bb1af98dcd8e3ff13ac55c87b516.JPG

Great looking work!

Want to get into some hedge laying myself just need time

Nice weather by the looks too

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FE9B237D-FC24-4BA3-98FC-CF2AB3041A51.thumb.jpeg.8bc65c5c5c9b530fc35f19eea5b5a385.jpeghere’s one i layed a couple yrs back,just to give an idea of regrowth,this one turned out pretty good 👍

Edited by gary112
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9 hours ago, gary112 said:

FE9B237D-FC24-4BA3-98FC-CF2AB3041A51.thumb.jpeg.8bc65c5c5c9b530fc35f19eea5b5a385.jpeghere’s one i layed a couple yrs back,just to give an idea of regrowth,this one turned out pretty good 👍

It certainly did . Mustard !

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41 minutes ago, Stubby said:

It certainly did . Mustard !

So much so I thought it was a spoof cos I can't tell the hedge was even laid; looks like a well trimmed ordinary one!  Top work and the hedge obviously thinks so too.

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