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Mr. Gall

Being an Arborist in the 3rd world.

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Cool, completely see your point mate. Yeh I know he's not very popular in some of these places. His company takes £billions of oil out of the country and makes £billions in profit. I suppose Its completely different when you are traveling. My brother usually goes out for a week, works out how best to screw the locals then he's back in business class on his way home. Or at least thats how many people see it.

Its very interesting to get different peoples opinions of the same places mate:thumbup1:

 

My brother regularly goes out to Seirra Leonne and teaches people how to shoot each other. They're armed 24/7 in a group of likeminded people and travel in convoy. His perception of Africa is totally different to mine, but so is the attitute he takes with him

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id rather be with ex special forces guards working for oil companys and hated by the locals than working on my own and just being disliked by them lol

but iv never been to peru id love to go see the temples and pryamids hidden in the jungles:001_cool:

 

Why would they dislike you?

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You wouldn't catch me anywhere near a third world country, far too uncivilised for my liking

 

I wouldnt mind doing a bit of charity work in a place where it was REALLY needed to be honest.

 

I think the experience would be very profound and character building if nothing else.:001_smile:

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I don't want to dispute what your brother says, but oil companies are not always the most popular organisations with local populations, plus everyone knows foriegn oil workers are paid very well and often on short contracts.

 

I'd travelled a fair bit either for surfing/work or both and have been to places which were considered to be not safe or total no go zones. I've never had a guard and I've never felt at all treatened bar one or 2 incedents which were entirely my own doing. Infact some of the poorest people in the most deprived areas I have found to be the most generous and hospitable. Meeting people from vastly different backgrounds and sharing experiences is incedibaly rewarding, especially when you learn some of their ingenious solutions to everyday problem. I'd say go go go, whatever happens your sure to have a blast. Don't fear it embrace it.

:congrats: Good post, a mate of mine works in the oil industry, earns fantastic money, has worked in many of the places I've travelled in but has completely different perceptions to me (though he might be right about Nigeria:biggrin:).

Where he sees threats and hostility, I've experienced kindness and hospitality. Like you, I've found that very often the people with absolutely nothing to their name are the most generous. Obviously it's not all sweetness and light, you do have to take your common sense with you, but I wouldn't walk around areas of many so-called 'civillised' cities at certain times of night.

If you don't do it, you'll never know and could spend an awfully long time thinking 'what if?'. My advice, for what it's worth, is go for it - this is life, not a rehearsal.:thumbup1:

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i have a romantic view in my head, but if the opportunity came, id take it for sure

 

lee, dont you live in ipswich???? thats 3rd world isnt it:lol:

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You guys need to travel more... there is heaps of stuff going on over there. I know good workers around south america like argentina, colombia, chile and brasil. I am from Brasil and working in New Zealand at the moment. I will be back home soon for a few months. Good people and not much danger if you know where you go, specially when you speak the language. Arboriculture is developing slowly, but it will get there eventually.

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You wouldn't catch me anywhere near a third world country, far too uncivilised for my liking

 

I've felt far safer amongst people in the developing nations than I ever have around certain facets of white Europeans and I include members of the BNP, travelling community and British youth culture.

In fact the most dangerous I have encountered are white male Australians from the Northern Territory. In this case I was rescued by a group of Aboriginal youths and taken back to their camp.

Such a statement Lee is born of a lack of worldly inexperience

Travel would improve your understanding and broaden your attitude towards your fellow men.

Ty

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If you decide to make this adventure make sure once you arrive to register with your Embassy or consulate give them all forwarding information if something happens, also in the event you loose your passport or the like you will have a better chance of getting your documents replaced sooner than later. All the best.

easy-lift guy

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