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Mr. Gall

Being an Arborist in the 3rd world.

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I am from Canada and I will be taking an arborist course at college in janurary. I was wondering if anyone knew anything at all about being an arborist in 3rd world countries. I would like to work in Peru, I know the pay will be **** and all that. But im wondering if there are even Arborists down there, someone has to trim the tree's right?

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I think you find it hard to find tree pruning work in true 3rd world countries. Most countries in South America aren't really 3rd world but are rapidly developing. I'm sure you'll find work, most likely in the private sector working for a bit of cash. It will be difficult to get a work permit to work for companies doing municipality works. The best advice would be to learn spanish, take your kit and find work whilst your there.

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Base training have some photos of work they did for a oil company in guinea massive trees and they earnt a fair bit from it as i was told give it a go hold your passport tight if i go tits up wouldnt want to be stuck there id find grantee work beforehand 3rd countrys look nice in photos but are nasty places once you leave the tourist spots youll be lucky if your competion doesnt shoot you lol

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Base training have some photos of work they did for a oil company in guinea massive trees and they earnt a fair bit from it as i was told give it a go hold your passport tight if i go tits up wouldnt want to be stuck there id find grantee work beforehand 3rd countrys look nice in photos but are nasty places once you leave the tourist spots youll be lucky if your competion doesnt shoot you lol

 

Good bit of advice. My brother travels a lot in these countries for work. He works for a big oil company. He stays in secure compounds and has a body guard from the time he gets off the plane, to the time he gets back on. These places are lovely, but do not under estimate the dangers.:thumbup1:

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Good bit of advice. My brother travels a lot in these countries for work. He works for a big oil company. He stays in secure compounds and has a body guard from the time he gets off the plane, to the time he gets back on. These places are lovely, but do not under estimate the dangers.:thumbup1:

 

I don't want to dispute what your brother says, but oil companies are not always the most popular organisations with local populations, plus everyone knows foriegn oil workers are paid very well and often on short contracts.

 

I'd travelled a fair bit either for surfing/work or both and have been to places which were considered to be not safe or total no go zones. I've never had a guard and I've never felt at all treatened bar one or 2 incedents which were entirely my own doing. Infact some of the poorest people in the most deprived areas I have found to be the most generous and hospitable. Meeting people from vastly different backgrounds and sharing experiences is incedibaly rewarding, especially when you learn some of their ingenious solutions to everyday problem. I'd say go go go, whatever happens your sure to have a blast. Don't fear it embrace it.

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I don't want to dispute what your brother says, but oil companies are not always the most popular organisations with local populations, plus everyone knows foriegn oil workers are paid very well and often on short contracts.

 

I'd travelled a fair bit either for surfing/work or both and have been to places which were considered to be not safe or total no go zones. I've never had a guard and I've never felt at all treatened bar one or 2 incedents which were entirely my own doing. Infact some of the poorest people in the most deprived areas I have found to be the most generous and hospitable. Meeting people from vastly different backgrounds and sharing experiences is incedibaly rewarding, especially when you learn some of their ingenious solutions to everyday problem. I'd say go go go, whatever happens your sure to have a blast. Don't fear it embrace it.

 

Cool, completely see your point mate. Yeh I know he's not very popular in some of these places. His company takes £billions of oil out of the country and makes £billions in profit. I suppose Its completely different when you are traveling. My brother usually goes out for a week, works out how best to screw the locals then he's back in business class on his way home. Or at least thats how many people see it.

Its very interesting to get different peoples opinions of the same places mate:thumbup1:

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id rather be with ex special forces guards working for oil companys and hated by the locals than working on my own and just being disliked by them lol

but iv never been to peru id love to go see the temples and pryamids hidden in the jungles:001_cool:

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