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Sending heat from upstairs to downstairs.


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Basically with the price of heating etc right now I'm looking to use my log burner a lot more next winter if not all the time if I can find a solution. 
 

My house is upside down, bedrooms below and front door and living room/burner on the top floor. 
Was wondering if there's a cheap effective way to get the hot air from the stove downstairs... 

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We recycle the heat from our laundry room / boiler room / inverter room / freezer room.

 

The dryer is a heat pump one so heat is released to the room.

The freezer gives off heat.

The heavily insulated thermal store & pipes still give off heat.

However the biggest heat source are the inverters during a battery charging session.

We have an extractor fan fitted in the celling that is insulated piped to the bathroom.

Initial plan was to have a sensor turning fan on & off as it warmed up.

However the room is always warmer than the bathroom & the positive pressure it creates pushes air out via the extractor that runs when light is on. So having it running 24/7 worked out great.

 

 

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17 hours ago, JDon said:

Basically with the price of heating etc right now I'm looking to use my log burner a lot more next winter if not all the time if I can find a solution. 
 

My house is upside down, bedrooms below and front door and living room/burner on the top floor. 
Was wondering if there's a cheap effective way to get the hot air from the stove downstairs... 

I do something similar from one downstairs room to te next. I found using a duct  to take air from the warm room to the other wasn't effective as you needed to shift a lot of air with very little temperature difference. So I made a couple of flexible metal ducts and sucked hotter air (about 30-40C directly above the stove convection vents and blew it to the room next door, my major mistake was not insulating the ducts  but it works and as a result we did not use the central heating at all last year. Downside is we got through  a 5m3 stack of mixed  logs.

 

The fan noise is a bit intrusive and consumes about 50W on its lowest setting, I need to measure this somewhen.

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23 minutes ago, JDon said:

I have heard people setting up a fan downstairs blowing the cold air up the staircase and there for circulating the air?

That doesn't make a lot of sense to me as the turbulence would cause too much mixing as the cold air blew into the warmer air, thus overall diluting the heat. Assuming the air stratifies as hot at the ceiling  of the upper room then logically suck air at ceiling level and pipe   it to floor level downstairs but as I said this leads to moving a lot more barely warm air than if you take a smaller amount of hotter air directly from the stove and pipe it down.

 

Also something I was unable to arrange was to vent the hot air out of a slot horizontally at floor level, the theory being the Coanda effect should let the hotter air hug the floor further before it rises.

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We used to have a room to room fan for moving warm air from the room we had the stove in. I wonder if you could do something similar? A fan set high in the room with the stove connected to ducting and ran within the stud wall and exiting low in the room you wish to heat?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think the only real solution is a back boiler type arrangement to your central heating, you can't cheat the laws of thermodynamics, any sort of fan blowing the air its going to create a larger temperature difference.

 

Unless you can duct the heat from the ceiling where the fireplace is, to the rooms, as cold air still needs to flow back to circulate.

 

Personally, use a back boiler and it would probably cut down your firewood usage considerably as your not trying to overcompensate by forcing the heat throughout the house.

Edited by GarethM
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