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Smilegr8

Willow cuttings - are they rot resistant ?

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1 minute ago, richyrich said:

It defo won't grow from cuttings that are not pushed into soil. 

unless pilled up with  a combination of dust and moisture 

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I wondered whether the use of wooden shingles was previously common in your area? I tried googling it, but I'm not on a winner with that one (too many language challenges!) - I found them in Romania but that was about the best I could achieve.

 

If so, they might meet your requirement of being in-keeping and thin. If the raw material is available (oak or sweet chestnut in suitable rounds) then it is practical to make your own, given time, as it's a very repetitive task, removing the need to find skilled craftsmen. No denying that a skilled craftsman will be faster, achieve a higher yield and they will look better, but it's possible to do an adequate job with very basic tools, some general idea of what you are doing and plenty of spare material to scrap!

 

Alec

 

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1 minute ago, Smilegr8 said:

unless pilled up with  a combination of dust and moisture 

Yes maybe would sprout a bit. A willow log will sprout and take root if it's just sat on damp soil. Twigs/shoots don't generally have enough stored reserves to take root so readily unless pushed into soil or stuck in water where they can get growing rapidly.👍

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1 minute ago, agg221 said:

I wondered whether the use of wooden shingles was previously common in your area? I tried googling it, but I'm not on a winner with that one (too many language challenges!) - I found them in Romania but that was about the best I could achieve.

 

If so, they might meet your requirement of being in-keeping and thin. If the raw material is available (oak or sweet chestnut in suitable rounds) then it is practical to make your own, given time, as it's a very repetitive task, removing the need to find skilled craftsmen. No denying that a skilled craftsman will be faster, achieve a higher yield and they will look better, but it's possible to do an adequate job with very basic tools, some general idea of what you are doing and plenty of spare material to scrap!

 

Alec

 

Oak shingles would look fantastic I just can't imagine how to secure them on the roof without damaging the waterproof layer underneath .  

Done properly a shingle roof won't need any waterproof membrane underneath but not in my case : ) 

I might spend this summer cutting shingles i guess 

thank you 

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28 minutes ago, Smilegr8 said:

Oak shingles would look fantastic I just can't imagine how to secure them on the roof without damaging the waterproof layer underneath .  

Done properly a shingle roof won't need any waterproof membrane underneath but not in my case : ) 

I might spend this summer cutting shingles i guess 

thank you 

I can answer that question, or at least one way of doing it, which is how I tiled my extension roof, which is also insulated over the rafters, then plywood, then membrane.

 

If you remove the asphalt, you should be able to see where the plywood is fixed down to the rafters/trusses. Mark these points top and bottom of the roof. Then apply a breathable membrane horizontally in strips, end to end. This would have been a lot easier with two people, but I did it by tacking the strip to the plywood along its top edge, where the rafters were. The strips overlapped so any water would run off. Then fix battens running top to bottom over every rafter, sandwiching the membrane, ply and rafter. Oak or sweet chestnut battens, fixed with helical stainless nails like this:

 

https://mammothroofing.co.uk/products/super-7-160mmthor-helical-pitched-roof-nails-box-of-100

 

which worked very well, but did need pilot holes in seasoned oak (no pilot hole needed if you are using softwood). My battens were not all straight but they could be pulled straight and held with the helix. It does put holes in the membrane but they are hidden under the batten so no leak path. Horizontal battens can then be fitted at the right spacing, nailing onto the vertical battens (which are called counter battens). Spacing can be rustic, using the curve of the battens, or uniform using a spacing block and bending them to shape. Bear in mind that if random you need to put the battens closer together to allow for the maximum gap, which means more shingles too. I was using outrageously expensive handmade tiles (to satisfy Listed Buildings) and that meant I wanted the fewest I could get away with, so pulled the battens straight. The shingles can then be fixed to the horizontal battens, either by hanging on pegs or using stainless annular ring shank nails (much easier). Pilot holes are needed. If you just try and nail onto the batten then it bounces too much, but sliding a block between it and the plywood stops that.

 

So long as the shingles are close enough together to stop direct sun getting through the membrane holds up pretty much forever.

 

It took me a while (I made all the batten too by cleaving sweet chestnut) but it came out nicely in the end, and it wasn't hard, just repetitive.

 

Alec

 

Edited by agg221

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10 hours ago, agg221 said:

I can answer that question, or at least one way of doing it, which is how I tiled my extension roof, which is also insulated over the rafters, then plywood, then membrane.

 

If you remove the asphalt, you should be able to see where the plywood is fixed down to the rafters/trusses. Mark these points top and bottom of the roof. Then apply a breathable membrane horizontally in strips, end to end. This would have been a lot easier with two people, but I did it by tacking the strip to the plywood along its top edge, where the rafters were. The strips overlapped so any water would run off. Then fix battens running top to bottom over every rafter, sandwiching the membrane, ply and rafter. Oak or sweet chestnut battens, fixed with helical stainless nails like this:

 

https://mammothroofing.co.uk/products/super-7-160mmthor-helical-pitched-roof-nails-box-of-100

 

which worked very well, but did need pilot holes in seasoned oak (no pilot hole needed if you are using softwood). My battens were not all straight but they could be pulled straight and held with the helix. It does put holes in the membrane but they are hidden under the batten so no leak path. Horizontal battens can then be fitted at the right spacing, nailing onto the vertical battens (which are called counter battens). Spacing can be rustic, using the curve of the battens, or uniform using a spacing block and bending them to shape. Bear in mind that if random you need to put the battens closer together to allow for the maximum gap, which means more shingles too. I was using outrageously expensive handmade tiles (to satisfy Listed Buildings) and that meant I wanted the fewest I could get away with, so pulled the battens straight. The shingles can then be fixed to the horizontal battens, either by hanging on pegs or using stainless annular ring shank nails (much easier). Pilot holes are needed. If you just try and nail onto the batten then it bounces too much, but sliding a block between it and the plywood stops that.

 

So long as the shingles are close enough together to stop direct sun getting through the membrane holds up pretty much forever.

 

It took me a while (I made all the batten too by cleaving sweet chestnut) but it came out nicely in the end, and it wasn't hard, just repetitive.

 

Alec

 

Alec thanks for such a detailed reply  

Initially I thought to start from the lower side of the roof and bolt down 90 degree metal corner brackets then roll  another asphalt felt to cover the screw / bolts  and repeat that to the top of the roof  then  vertical battens can be fitted on the metal brackets 

 

Since you've done it already - im gonna print your advise and keep it in the draw as sounds a very good way of doing it 

 

Thanks again 

Iurie 

 

 

Edited by Smilegr8

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If you use an air coil nail gun with un pointed stainless steel nails can make the job much easier 

nails from spotnails in South Wales 

Edited by dumper
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20 minutes ago, Stere said:

what look like shingles are a traditional there?

 

molodovia house

 

119 Traditional Moldavian Village House Photos - Free & Royalty-Free Stock  Photos from Dreamstime

 

 

Church in romania being re done

 

 

In Romania the old traditional building skills are reviving or shall I say it never died?  While we speak nearly the same language , Moldova was part of USSR for 70 years and that drastically changed the traditions and building culture/approach . These days if you see a traditionally built house with a thatched roof or wooden shingles then is almost certainly thats a village museum  or an eco-hotel . 

 

Is not gonna be quick or easy but i will  go for oak shingles to cover our farmhouse.  Have a garage full of machinery  and done quite a bit of woodworking in the past , from cutting and drying my own lumber to window frames etc . 

 

One more question - will i have to treat or seal the shingles at all ?  May be with a water repellant  solution? 

 

Regards 

Iurie

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3 minutes ago, Smilegr8 said:

In Romania the old traditional building skills are reviving or shall I say it never died?  While we speak nearly the same language , Moldova was part of USSR for 70 years and that drastically changed the traditions and building culture/approach . These days if you see a traditionally built house with a thatched roof or wooden shingles then is almost certainly thats a village museum  or an eco-hotel . 

 

Is not gonna be quick or easy but i will  go for oak shingles to cover our farmhouse.  Have a garage full of machinery  and done quite a bit of woodworking in the past , from cutting and drying my own lumber to window frames etc . 

 

One more question - will i have to treat or seal the shingles at all ?  May be with a water repellant  solution? 

 

Regards 

Iurie

No, you won't have to treat them. It sounds like your climate goes from hot and dry to cold and snowy, rather than permanently damp like the UK. Even here they will last a good 30-50yrs on an ordinary pitch roof, so given that in your location they should last better, I would think you will only do it once in your lifetime. There are many good videos on Youtube showing shingle making but as a starter, this one is pretty useful.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZA1J8RHltY

 

I haven't made shingles, but have split a reasonable amount of lath for my ceilings, along with all the battens for the roof. It takes a long time, but I find it relaxing - a nice job for a few hours of an evening.

 

Alec

 

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