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Blade advice for green Scots pine


Buttered Scones
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Newbie here. 

We live on a Northumberland hill farm and we got hit pretty bad by Storm Arwen (11 days with no electricity!). We're still cleaning up and I am processing several Scots pines that were blown over. 

Using the general farm saw - a relatively recent Husky 135 with a 14" bar and the usual Oregon general purpose blades. I am replacing blades every hour or so and re sharpening using my Granberg so the angles are correct.

 

Now with the upper branch wood, this set up works fine, however, I am really struggling with lower trunk. Scots pine is pretty tough stuff when green.

 

Can anyone suggest a full chisel blade that would fit this saw and where I could get a supply in the UK? Alternatively, any recommendations for a better blade for cutting dense green wood would be very welcome. 

 

cheers in advance

Buttered Scones 

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24 minutes ago, Buttered Scones said:

Newbie here. 

We live on a Northumberland hill farm and we got hit pretty bad by Storm Arwen (11 days with no electricity!). We're still cleaning up and I am processing several Scots pines that were blown over. 

Using the general farm saw - a relatively recent Husky 135 with a 14" bar and the usual Oregon general purpose blades. I am replacing blades every hour or so and re sharpening using my Granberg so the angles are correct.

 

Now with the upper branch wood, this set up works fine, however, I am really struggling with lower trunk. Scots pine is pretty tough stuff when green.

 

Can anyone suggest a full chisel blade that would fit this saw and where I could get a supply in the UK? Alternatively, any recommendations for a better blade for cutting dense green wood would be very welcome. 

 

cheers in advance

Buttered Scones 

I think there’s something else going on here. You shouldn’t be changing chains every hour unless you are being a bit clumsy with the saw and hitting the ground often. 
 

i wouldn’t have said Scots pine was particularly tough to cut and oregon chain is certainly up to the task. 

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31 minutes ago, Buttered Scones said:

Newbie here. 

We live on a Northumberland hill farm and we got hit pretty bad by Storm Arwen (11 days with no electricity!). We're still cleaning up and I am processing several Scots pines that were blown over. 

Using the general farm saw - a relatively recent Husky 135 with a 14" bar and the usual Oregon general purpose blades. I am replacing blades every hour or so and re sharpening using my Granberg so the angles are correct.

 

Now with the upper branch wood, this set up works fine, however, I am really struggling with lower trunk. Scots pine is pretty tough stuff when green.

 

Can anyone suggest a full chisel blade that would fit this saw and where I could get a supply in the UK? Alternatively, any recommendations for a better blade for cutting dense green wood would be very welcome. 

 

cheers in advance

Buttered Scones 

 

Hi and welcome, you'll be able to find any chain [ not blade ] and any sharpening advice you need on this site.

Maybe you need to check the depth gauges / rakers to see if you're  getting the right depth of cut ?

As said above Oregon chain should be fine.

 

 


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Edited by Macpherson
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Part of the reason you struggle with " the lower trunk " is its a 35cc " home owner saw " . Keeping it sharp and taking down the rakers every third sharpen will help . Keeping it out of the dirt will help . A bigger saw will help !

Edited by Stubby
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3 hours ago, Buttered Scones said:

Scots pine is pretty tough stuff when green.

Wait 'till you try splitting it. The knotty stuff is some of the toughest wood I've ever tried to split!

 

I have a similar sizes saw and it seemed to cope fine on Scots, it was running the 91VXL chain. I try not to take the depth gauges down too far if I'm logging up something big.

 

Is your chain definitely getting blunt? I find the bar can pinch slightly in bigger wood, knocking in a plastic wedge in the top of a cut when half way through a log helps.

 

I've found the chain can get blunt when processing ash that's been down a while, I just take a hand file with me and give it a quick sharpen every so often. I also thought full chisel chains are more prone to blunting.

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3 hours ago, Stubby said:

Part of the reason you struggle with " the lower trunk " is its a 35cc " home owner saw " . Keeping it sharp and taking down the rakers every third sharpen will help . Keeping it out of the dirt will help . A bigger saw will help !

 

I'll have you know the 135 is a massive 41cc Stubby.

As for the full chisel chains they will not stay sharp any longer than the semi chisel in my experience. I got a couple for the 135 from Northern Arb supplies.

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9 minutes ago, peatff said:

 

I'll have you know the 135 is a massive 41cc Stubby.

As for the full chisel chains they will not stay sharp any longer than the semi chisel in my experience. I got a couple for the 135 from Northern Arb supplies.

Well yes . A dull chain is a dull chain whatever cutter type . Semi is supposed to take damage a bit better that full . However all my saws have full because I feel it cuts faster . Just keep them out of the dirt . I wrongly assumed the capacity of a 135 . Sorry . Its not a pro saw though ....

Edited by Stubby
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1 hour ago, Stubby said:

Well yes . A dull chain is a dull chain whatever cutter type . Semi is supposed to take damage a bit better that full . However all my saws have full because I feel it cuts faster . Just keep them out of the dirt . I wrongly assumed the capacity of a 135 . Sorry . Its not a pro saw though ....

You're right there. Full chisel does cut quicker. I only used semi on big saws as they need sharpening less then. 

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