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what is the best wood for kindling


Jp2021
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2 minutes ago, Jp2021 said:

In your opinion, what's the best wood you use for kindling on scale? 

Not interested in pallets or wood offcuts. 

Fat wood .  Pine cut from the dark heart wood rich in resin . You can light a stick with a match . Bloody expensive though !

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17 minutes ago, Stubby said:

Fat wood .  Pine cut from the dark heart wood rich in resin . You can light a stick with a match . Bloody expensive though !

I was given a whole load of Corsican pine years ago and it was chock full of fatwood - still using it now to make kindling. Leylandii I find a bit knotty to split but cedar is superb.

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I am living in Scotland which might explain my answer conforming to stereotypes.

"The free stuff".. though even the English, Welsh or Irish on here are not adverse to that type either

 

It will all burn, I like pallet wood simply because it splits down thin very easily, and offcuts tend to be very dry .

 

Softwoods are better than hardwoods and anything with a straight grain. Anything gnarly isn't so good. My favoured at the moment is the rare pine I have in my log pile (I got gifted a lot of hard wood over the summer... dry pine is rare in the garage this season). Likewise would go with anything that was sappy as well, sticky to split but burns well. Anything nice and dry of course

 

My other favoured source are the splinters that come off when I am chopping my main logs, mostly they are perfect kindling with no effort at all. That all goes into a box behind my splitting area and dries slowly to be good for the winter. Anything left from that in the summer is perfect BBQ wood too.

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Floorboards. I've got a stack after replacing the floor in a bedroom. It splits and burns beautifully as kindling. Not sure what the wood is but it's softwood and obviously bone dry. The house is 1930s is so it's whatever they were using then. I'd like to know if anyone has any ideas of an ID.

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