Jump to content
Billhook

Guess the Weight, Thanksgiving Quiz!

Recommended Posts

8 minutes ago, Squaredy said:

If the scales are accurate, and the dimensions given correct, then that is almost a fully dry piece of Elm.  Good fun, let's have some more!

Oh yeah Gav great fun

Edited by topchippyles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha! I'm actually chuffed that I was even close. I must admit that it was a pure guess on my part. It just looked like the right weight for that piece, given the info.

Regardless of what the result may have been it was a nice bit of lighthearted fun and an interesting little experiment too. 

Thank you very much billhook, you've made my day!

Now I'll have to stick on my anorak and come up with some particularly dull anecdotes on chain tension, file sizes and power to weight ratios.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Big J said:

 

Wow, that is light. I was going to guess 370kg, which already made an allowance for it being a bit dead. Had it been fresh felled elm from Edinburgh, it would have been well over 400kg.

 

 

i had it a 427kgs on fresh felled, knocked 12% off for it drying a bit which came out at 376kgs but goes to show what i know !! that had dried out alot,,

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, muttley9050 said:

Thanks Bill. I Blame the fact I didn't win on woodworks m3 calcs. He must of been wrong emoji849.pngemoji23.png

First off thanks Billhook for a bit of fun 👍

 

 

I will show my workings 😆

 

14' is 168"  so 168"x4"x42"=28224  cubic inches. There are 1728 cubic inches in a cubic foot so 28224/1728 =16.3 cubic feet. 

 

There are 35.31 cubic feet in a cubic meter so 16.3/35.31=0.46 cubic meters

 

 I looked up the weight of English elm and the first link came up with 600kg a cubic meter. I worked on it being pretty dry as standing dead and upped that to 650kg a cubic meter.  0.46x650 = 299 which was my guess. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Billhook said:

Slab of Elm

 

Andrew.                                504 kg

Spruce Pirate.                      153  kg

Woodworks.                          299 kg

AJStrees.                               240 kg.   (300)

Topchippyles.                        220 kg

Trigger Andy.                          235 kg.   (270)

Dave at Dave.                         375 kg

Puffing Billy                             380-400 kg

Timm                                        295-310 kg

Muttley.                                    345 kg

Mark J.                                     425 kg

Spud dog.                                 376 kg

Treerover.                                  160.2 kg

Mr Ed.                                         275 kg

Conor Wright.                            272 kg

Squaredy.                                   371 kg

Monkey Business.                     356 kg

Organic Guy.                              292 kg

Josh Purton.                               346 kg

Bike User.                                    256 kg

Dumper.                                       306 kg

Wonky.                        
 

Well it looks as though Conor Wright is the closest at 272 kg as the scales say 296 kg less the 25 kg Wiltec grab equals 271 kg.  So only one kg out!

Hats off to Mr Ed for 275 kg

Quite a few not far away

Trigger Andy said he would not be surprised at 270kg which is lucky for me as it would either have to be half a mug or two mugs!

 

Did not quite have the centre of gravity right when lifting but it does give a wonderful dappled effect on the slab which is not the grain!

 

So perhaps Conor can give us all a talk on chainsaws as a punishment for winning!

What has he learned about them, what makes does he prefer, how does he sharpen them, and any advice he would give to a beginner .

 

So if you can pm your address Conor I will see if they have any mugs left or if they have all been bought by Arbtalkers!

74DFD212-0B26-4AE2-8B57-EEEC1275FF87.jpeg

B78E9F77-D0DB-4BEC-9202-C66671840110.jpeg

4522DDA5-1409-4C65-B865-663CD24D5493.jpeg

Was that after you compensated for the sawdust? 🤤 well done. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Squaredy said:

If the scales are accurate, and the dimensions given correct, then that is almost a fully dry piece of Elm.  Good fun, let's have some more!

You are obviously as sad as me!

 

What started me thinking was the thread on weights of wood, Loose stacked/m3 tight stacked and solid.

I will try and weigh an even log of Sycamore with accurate dimensions and cut it up with the Lucas into perhaps 8x8 or 6x6 or 6x8s at 18 inches long and stack a couple of my potato boxes, one tight and one loose as a matter of interest.

 

I have the top half of this Elm which is looking very interesting so I will try and weigh the whole log for a Christmas competition if the scales will take it!

 

Well done everyone, at least it made you all think!

Looking forward to Conor's chainsaw thread  "I learned about chainsawing from that!"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  •  

  • Featured Adverts

  • Tip site reviews

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.